Dec 12, 2019

Twitter will make it easier to identify political candidates

Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Twitter is launching two initiatives that will help users better identify political candidates on its platform, the company announced Thursday.

Why it matters: It's an effort to curb misinformation, making it easier for users to find original sources of information.

What's happening: Twitter is partnering with Ballotpedia, a nonprofit and nonpartisan online political encyclopedia, to identify the official campaign Twitter accounts of candidates.

  • The company is bringing back "election labels," a feature it first launched during the 2018 midterms. Twitter says that in the week before Election Day in 2018, 13% of conversation on its platform about the midterms included a tweet with an election label.
  • Beginning this week, Twitter will start identifying candidates who qualify for the primary ballot for House, Senate and gubernatorial races with a verified badge.

Go deeper: Twitter adds candidate labels ahead of midterm elections

Go deeper

The latest: George Floyd protests nationwide

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued for a seventh day across the U.S., with President Trump threatening on Monday to deploy the military if the unrest continues.

The latest: New York Attorney General Letitia James responded to Trump's comments by tweeting that he "is not a dictator & he doesn’t have the right to unilaterally deploy U.S. military across American states. We will guard the right to peaceful protest & will not hesitate to go to court to protect our constitutional rights during this time & well into the future."

2 hours ago - World

The world watches America burn

Newspaper front pages via the Newseum

The world is watching the grief and anger, violence and pain in America's streets.

The big picture: The U.S. accounts for nearly one-third of the world's deaths from COVID-19. The killing of a black man, George Floyd, by police has sparked days of protest and nights of chaos in America's major cities.

Trump walks to historic St. John's Church outside White House as protests rage

President Trump walked to the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church, located just steps away from the White House across Lafayette Park, on Monday night as protests linked to the murder of George Floyd raged across the capital and cities around the country.

What we're seeing: Military police and park rangers used physical force and tear gas on peaceful protestors to clear the area so that Trump could "pay respects" to the church that was damaged by a fire on Sunday.