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Photo: Twitter

Twitter said Monday it will begin labeling coronavirus-related tweets that contain potentially misleading information but that don't clearly violate company misinformation policies.

Why it matters: The move comes as it and other platforms such as Facebook and YouTube struggle with a flood of misinformation, as highlighted in Monday's Axios Login.

  • Twitter said that it may issue warning labels on tweets that post misleading information or disputed claims, though it will still remove posts with false information and a severe likelihood of causing harm.
  • "These warnings will inform people that the information in the Tweet conflicts with public health experts’ guidance before they view it," Twitter said in a blog post.

Of note: Asked if the policy would apply to President Trump if he posts "harmful misleading information," Twitter said: "These labels will apply to anyone sharing misleading information that meets the requirements of our policy, including world leaders."

  • When it comes to removing posts entirely, Twitter has a policy of allowing some tweets that would otherwise violate the rules to remain up, with a note.

Between the lines: The move is similar to one Twitter has put in place for synthetic and manipulated media, as well as to a rarely used option Twitter has to label posts from elected officials and world leaders that would otherwise be taken down for violating the site's rules.

Meanwhile: Michigan's governor called on Facebook to take stronger action against threats being made against her, some in private groups, ahead of planned armed rally in Lansing.

Go deeper

Aug 19, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Most Americans think social media platforms censor political viewpoints

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Most Americans say it's very (37%) or somewhat (36%) likely that social media platforms intentionally censor political viewpoints that they find objectionable, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

Why it matters: The survey shows that the concept of tech censorship, a political argument for the right, has turned into a mainstream belief.

5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Rahm Emanuel floated for Transportation secretary

Rahm Emanuel. Photo: Joshua Lott for The Washington Post via Getty Images

President-elect Biden is strongly considering Rahm Emanuel to run the Department of Transportation, weighing the former Chicago mayor’s experience on infrastructure spending against concerns from progressives over his policing record.

Why it matters: The DOT could effectively become the new Commerce Department, as infrastructure spending, smart cities construction and the rollout of drone-delivery programs take on increasing economic weight.

5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden turns to experienced hands for White House economic team

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Joe Biden plans to announce Cecilia Rouse and Brian Deese as part of his economic team and Neera Tanden to head the Office of Management and Budget, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: These are experienced hands. Unveiling a diverse group of advisers also may draw attention away from a selection of Deese to run the National Economic Council. Some progressives have criticized his work at BlackRock, the world's largest asset management firm.

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