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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Photo: Twitter

Twitter said Monday it will begin labeling coronavirus-related tweets that contain potentially misleading information but that don't clearly violate company misinformation policies.

Why it matters: The move comes as it and other platforms such as Facebook and YouTube struggle with a flood of misinformation, as highlighted in Monday's Axios Login.

  • Twitter said that it may issue warning labels on tweets that post misleading information or disputed claims, though it will still remove posts with false information and a severe likelihood of causing harm.
  • "These warnings will inform people that the information in the Tweet conflicts with public health experts’ guidance before they view it," Twitter said in a blog post.

Of note: Asked if the policy would apply to President Trump if he posts "harmful misleading information," Twitter said: "These labels will apply to anyone sharing misleading information that meets the requirements of our policy, including world leaders."

  • When it comes to removing posts entirely, Twitter has a policy of allowing some tweets that would otherwise violate the rules to remain up, with a note.

Between the lines: The move is similar to one Twitter has put in place for synthetic and manipulated media, as well as to a rarely used option Twitter has to label posts from elected officials and world leaders that would otherwise be taken down for violating the site's rules.

Meanwhile: Michigan's governor called on Facebook to take stronger action against threats being made against her, some in private groups, ahead of planned armed rally in Lansing.

Go deeper

Aug 19, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Most Americans think social media platforms censor political viewpoints

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Most Americans say it's very (37%) or somewhat (36%) likely that social media platforms intentionally censor political viewpoints that they find objectionable, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

Why it matters: The survey shows that the concept of tech censorship, a political argument for the right, has turned into a mainstream belief.

Cuomo asks New York AG and chief judge to choose "independent" investigator into sexual harassment claims

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo at a press conference on Feb. 24. Photo: Seth Wenig/pool/AFP via Getty Images

A special counselor to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo released a statement on Sunday asking the state's attorney general and chief judge to jointly pick an "independent and qualified lawyer in private practice without political affiliation" to investigate claims of sexual harassment against the governor.

The state of play: The statement is an about-face from Cuomo, who had previously selected a former judge close to a top aide to lead the investigation, the New York Times reported, a move that was widely criticized.

Republican Sen. Sasse slams Nebraska GOP for "weird worship" of Trump after state party rebuke

Sen. Ben Sasse, (R-Neb.) Photo: Andrew Harnik - Pool/Getty Images

The Nebraska Republican Party on Saturday formally "rebuked" Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) for his vote to impeach former President Trump earlier this year, though it stopped short of a formal censure, CNN reports.

Why it matters: Sasse is the latest among a slate of Republicans who have faced some sort of punishment from their state party apparatus after voting to impeach the former president. The senator responded statement Saturday, per the Omaha World-Herald, saying "most Nebraskans don't think politics should be about the weird worship of one dude."

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