Nov 27, 2019

Twitter plans to purge inactive accounts

Photo: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Twitter is warning its inactive users — those who haven't logged on in over six months — that their accounts will be deleted unless they sign in by Dec. 11, The Verge first reported Tuesday.

Why it matters, via Axios' Ina Fried: By deleting accounts, Twitter could hurt its overall metrics as well as the follower counts of individual users. Dormant user names could also become available to people who want to make more frequent use of the service.

  • But what Twitter loses in absolute user numbers, it could gain through increased credibility of those numbers.

Where it stands: After Dec. 11, Twitter will remove accounts "over many months — not just on a single day," a Twitter spokesperson told the Verge. The effort is part of Twitter's aim to "present more accurate, credible information people can trust" across the platform.

Go deeper: Twitter refines political ad rules

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Twitter pauses plan to delete inactive accounts

Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Twitter said Wednesday it was putting on hold a plan to delete inactive accounts amid concerns that accounts from deceased users would be swept up in the purge.

Why it matters: While it's great to see Twitter clearing out the accounts of living people who aren't using them, Twitter also represents an important record of those no longer here.

Go deeperArrowNov 27, 2019

Twitter will make it easier to identify political candidates

Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Twitter is launching two initiatives that will help users better identify political candidates on its platform, the company announced Thursday.

Why it matters: It's an effort to curb misinformation, making it easier for users to find original sources of information.

Go deeperArrowDec 12, 2019

Twitter aims to build an open standard for social networks

Jack Dorsey. Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted on Wednesday that his company is funding an effort to build an open source, decentralized social network that Twitter would ultimately become one of many services users could interact with.

Why it matters: It's a bold move that could broaden the reach of Twitter's network, but it could also open the door for direct competitors. Plus, similar efforts in the past have struggled to take off.

Go deeperArrowDec 11, 2019