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It's notable that Twitter, like other social networks, has announced stricter rules on virus-related misinformation than other types of false posts. Even more notable, though, is that Twitter has actually enforced its rules against prominent accounts in recent days.

Why it matters: Twitter has been criticized for being lax to enforce its rules, particularly against well-known politicians and celebrities.

Driving the news: Twitter temporarily locked the account of The Federalist after it linked to one of its articles suggesting the best way to approach the coronavirus was to spread it to as many young people as possible quickly in order to build immunity.

  • Twitter deleted a tweet from Rudy Giuliani quoting conservative activist Charlie Kirk, who touted hydroxychloroquine, an anti-malaria drug, as a cure for the coronavirus. (It has yet to be scientifically determined to be effective at treating COVID-19.)
  • Twitter deleted a pair of tweets by Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro that cast doubt on the need for quarantines. Bolsonaro has downplayed the risks of the coronavirus.

Twitter has made several adjustments to its rules specifically targeting misinformation about COVID-19, including how it is spread and transmitted as well as cures and treatments not backed up by medical authorities.

Yes, but: There are plenty of examples of Twitter failing to act, even regarding the coronavirus. The company allowed to stand a tweet from Elon Musk that said that children were immune from COVID-19 (they aren't) as well as other tweets of dubious veracity.

Go deeper: Coronavirus panic sells as alarmist information flies on social media

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Updated 42 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 32,844,146 — Total deaths: 994,208 — Total recoveries: 22,715,726Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 7,078,798 — Total deaths: 204,497 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Graham hopes his panel will approve Amy Coney Barrett by late October

Sen. Lindsey Graham during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 24, 2020 in Washington, DC. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told Fox News Saturday he expects confirmation hearings on Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court to start Oct. 12 and for his panel to approve her by Oct. 26.

Why it matters: That would mean the final confirmation vote could take place on the Senate floor before the Nov. 3 presidential election.

Texas city declares disaster after brain-eating amoeba found in water supply

Characteristics associated with a case of amebic meningoencephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri parasites. Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Texas authorities have issued a warning amid concerns that the water supply in the southeast of the state may contain the brain-eating amoeba naegleria fowleri following the death of a 6-year-old boy.

Details: The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality issued a "do not use" water alert Friday for eight cities, along with the Clemens and Wayne Scott Texas Department of Criminal Justice corrections centers and the Dow Chemical plant in Freeport. This was later lifted for all places except for Lake Jackson, which issued a disaster declaration Saturday.