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Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Twitter has removed a picture from a tweet by President Trump on Tuesday after it received a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) complaint from the New York Times, which owns the rights to the photo.

Why it matters: This is the second time in two weeks that Twitter has had to take down content from Trump's account due to a copyright violation.

  • Twitter and Facebook both removed a manipulated video tweeted by the president's account two weeks ago after the parents of the toddler subjects featured in the video lodged a copyright claim.

Details: A Twitter spokesperson confirmed that the tweet in question had been actioned due to a DMCA complaint from a rights holder. A Times spokesperson confirmed that it filed the take-down notice and that Twitter took action.

  • The copyright complaint was posted to the Lumen Database, a database that gathers legal complaints and requests for removal of online material.
  • Twitter notes in its copyright policy that it responds to valid copyright complaints sent to it by a copyright owner or their authorized representatives.
  • Twitter regularly shares the total number of DMCA takedown notices and counter-notices it receives for Twitter and Twitter-owned Periscope content.

Between the lines: The photo shows a picture taken by Damon Winter, a Pulitzer-Prize winning photographer for The New York Times. The photo was taken by The Times to accompany a feature it wrote on then candidate Donald Trump in 2015.

  • Twitter confirmed that the image in question that was taken down was utilized in a meme that was tweeted by the president.

The big picture: The action comes as Big Tech platforms are increasingly cracking down on the president's accounts for violating its policies or spreading misinformation.

Go deeper

Domestic online meddling threatens 2020 election

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Social media platforms are scrambling to crack down on domestic actors who have picked up foreign meddling techniques to try to influence the 2020 election — an effort that's resulted in a spate of action against U.S.-based conservatives.

The big picture: Domestic influence campaigns are not new, but tech firms are more aware of them this cycle. The companies also have more help from intelligence agencies and media companies to help uncover these operations and shut them down.

Supreme Court rejects second GOP effort to cut absentee ballot deadline in N.C.

Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images

The Supreme Court, for the second time in two days, rejected a GOP request to shorten the deadline mail-in ballots must be received by North Carolina officials to be counted.

The state of play: The state's deadline had been extended from 3 days to 9 days post-Election Day.

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