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Photo: Twitter

Twitter said Wednesday that it will add voice messages to tweets — allowing up to 140 seconds of audio.

Why it matters: Twitter is already the go-to platform for breaking news in the U.S. and often around the world. Voice Tweets will add a new dimension to breaking news for the site, as users can record what's happening around them or record their thoughts and reflections immediately and post them as events unfold.

Details: Voice Tweets will appear in Twitter's timeline alongside other regular text tweets. To listen, tap the image of the user in the center of the voice tweet. The tweets can play audio while users continue to scroll.

  • For users who go over the 140 seconds, a new audio tweet will be added to the timeline and threaded to the previous audio tweet.

The big picture: Over the years, Twitter has built several new features, including photos, videos, gifs and extra characters to give users ways to personalize their messages.

What's next: The feature rolls out on Wednesday to a limited number of people and will be unveiled to all Twitter users in the coming weeks.

Go deeper: The nerve center of the American news cycle

Go deeper

Twitter account linked to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi hacked

Narendra Modi. Photo: Prakash Singh/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter confirmed on Wednesday night that Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's personal account has been hacked, with tweets that have since been taken down asking his 2.5 million followers to donate to a cryptocurrency relief fund.

Why it matters: This hacking follows a similar cryptocurrency scam in July, when hackers took over the accounts of Joe Biden, Barack Obama, Elon Musk, Bill Gates and other notable figures.

What they're saying: Twitter said in a statement it's "actively investigating" the hacking of @narendramodi_in. "At this time, we are not aware of additional accounts being impacted," it said.

Go deeper: Twitter hack raises fears of an unstable election

4 mins ago - Podcasts

Former FDA chief Rob Califf on the vaccine approval process

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reviewing two emergency use authorization requests for COVID-19 vaccines, with an outside advisory committee scheduled to meet next Thursday to review data from Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech.

Axios Re:Cap digs in with former FDA commissioner Rob Calif about the EUA process, the science and who should make the final call.

The recovery needs rocket fuel

Data: BLS. Chart: Axios Visuals

Friday's deeply disappointing jobs report should light a fire under Congress, which has dithered despite signs the economy is struggling to kick back into gear.

Driving the news: President-elect Biden said Friday afternoon in Wilmington that he supports another round of $1,200 checks.