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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Twitter is adding new security measures for a designated group of high-profile, election-related Twitter accounts in the U.S.

Why it matters: The move follows a major hack of high-profile Twitter users in July that security experts worry could foreshadow security risks ahead of the election.

Details: Beginning Thursday, accounts belonging to members of the U.S. Executive Branch, U.S. Congress, U.S. Governors and Secretaries of State, presidential campaigns, political parties and candidates with Twitter Election Labels running for U.S. House, U.S. Senate, or Governor will be required to implement the new features.

Twitter
  • The select accounts that are required to make security changes will be informed via an in-app notification from Twitter about a few of the initial account security measures the tech giant will require or strongly recommend. (See above.)
  • While Twitter says it's requiring certain accounts to take these measures, it encourages anyone who has an account to take these additional precautions as well.

The big picture: For Twitter, it's not just important to keep accounts safe, but to also make sure its platform is trusted by users and regulators around the world. Following its major hack in July, policymakers expressed concern about the platform's vulnerabilities.

What's next: Twitter says it will implement additional proactive internal security safeguards for these accounts in the coming weeks, including more sophisticated detections and alerts and expedited account recovery support.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
Dec 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Biden says Russian-linked cyberattack started "last year"

President-elect Biden speaks Tuesday. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Biden said during his remarks in Wilmington on Tuesday that the Russia-tied cyberattack, which formerly was known to go back to as early as March, began "at least last year."

Why it matters: An administration source verified the earlier breach date — compounding the work and expense involved in rooting out the intruders, discovering what was lost and fixing for the future.

Exclusive: White House meeting with members of Problem Solvers Caucus

Members of the Problem Solvers Caucus discuss the COVID-19 relief bill in December. Photo: Oliver Contreras/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Top White House officials will meet Wednesday with a bipartisan coalition of House lawmakers as the administration tries to enlist moderates to support the president's infrastructure proposal.

Why it matters: The meeting is something of an olive branch after President Biden's team courted groups of progressives to back the $2.2 trillion package.

2 hours ago - Health

The new vaccine threat is fear itself

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The FDA’s decision to pause the use of Johnson & Johnson's coronavirus vaccine has set off a chain reaction of fear — about the safety of the vaccine, and about whether the FDA is overreacting — that's causing unnecessary drama just as the vaccine effort is finally picking up speed.

The big picture: Throughout the pandemic, the public and the media, and sometimes even regulators, have struggled to keep risks in perspective — to acknowledge them without exaggerating them, and to avoid downplaying them because other people will exaggerate them.