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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Twitter is adding new security measures for a designated group of high-profile, election-related Twitter accounts in the U.S.

Why it matters: The move follows a major hack of high-profile Twitter users in July that security experts worry could foreshadow security risks ahead of the election.

Details: Beginning Thursday, accounts belonging to members of the U.S. Executive Branch, U.S. Congress, U.S. Governors and Secretaries of State, presidential campaigns, political parties and candidates with Twitter Election Labels running for U.S. House, U.S. Senate, or Governor will be required to implement the new features.

Twitter
  • The select accounts that are required to make security changes will be informed via an in-app notification from Twitter about a few of the initial account security measures the tech giant will require or strongly recommend. (See above.)
  • While Twitter says it's requiring certain accounts to take these measures, it encourages anyone who has an account to take these additional precautions as well.

The big picture: For Twitter, it's not just important to keep accounts safe, but to also make sure its platform is trusted by users and regulators around the world. Following its major hack in July, policymakers expressed concern about the platform's vulnerabilities.

What's next: Twitter says it will implement additional proactive internal security safeguards for these accounts in the coming weeks, including more sophisticated detections and alerts and expedited account recovery support.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
Dec 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Biden says Russian-linked cyberattack started "last year"

President-elect Biden speaks Tuesday. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Biden said during his remarks in Wilmington on Tuesday that the Russia-tied cyberattack, which formerly was known to go back to as early as March, began "at least last year."

Why it matters: An administration source verified the earlier breach date — compounding the work and expense involved in rooting out the intruders, discovering what was lost and fixing for the future.

Off the Rails

Episode 4: Trump turns on Barr

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Drew Angerer, Pool/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 4: Trump torches what is arguably the most consequential relationship in his Cabinet.

Attorney General Bill Barr stood behind a chair in the private dining room next to the Oval Office, looming over Donald Trump. The president sat at the head of the table. It was Dec. 1, nearly a month after the election, and Barr had some sharp advice to get off his chest. The president's theories about a stolen election, Barr told Trump, were "bullshit."

In photos: Protests outside fortified capitols draw only small groups

Armed members of the far-right extremist group the Boogaloo Bois near the Michigan Capitol Building in Lansing on Jan. 17. About 20 protesters showed up, AP notes. Photo: Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Small groups of protesters gathered outside fortified statehouses across the U.S. over the weekend ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The big picture: Some protests attracted armed members of far-right extremist groups but there were no reports of clashes, as had been feared. The National Guard and law enforcement outnumbered demonstrators, as security was heightened around the U.S. to avoid a repeat of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots, per AP.