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Europe, China threaten retaliation over Trump's tariffs

President Donald Trump. Photo: Samuel Corum / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

Donald Trump's move on Thursday to push forward his tariffs on steel and aluminum imports has already prompted threats of retaliation.

Why it matters: While the tariffs aren't quite as drastic as originally believed, they're still facing backlash — even at home. Trump's decision met with immediate rebuke from high-profile Republicans and some U.S. manufacturers amid growing concern that a trade war could hurt the economy and risk thousands of jobs.

What they're saying:

  • French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire: "There are only losers in a trade war ... With our EU partners, we will assess consequences on our industries and agree (an) appropriate response."
  • EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström: "The EU is a close ally of the US and we continue to be of the view that the EU should be excluded from these measures. I will seek more clarity on this issue in days to come." She also suggested that the E.U. could impose tariffs on cranberries, orange juice and peanut butter, according to The Washington Post.
  • China Foreign Minister Wang Yi, per Reuters: “Especially given today’s globalization, choosing a trade war is a mistaken prescription. The outcome will only be harmful. China would have to make a justified and necessary response.”
Kim Hart 4 hours ago
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Tech's terrible week

A sad computer
Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

From a fatal car crash to a data nightmare, turning-point scenarios played out in several corners of the technology industry this week.

Why it matters: The utopian promise of technological progress is giving way to the very thorny challenges of balancing innovation with social accountability. That means congressional hearings, investigations, probably at least some regulation — and a lot more skepticism about the promise of the tech-driven changes that are transforming our lives.

Zachary Basu 5 hours ago
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What to watch for in Egypt's sham election

Sisi billboard
A billboard in Cairo voicing support for Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi in the upcoming election. Photo by KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images.

Egyptians will vote March 26-28 in a presidential election that is sure to see incumbent strongman Abdel Fattah el-Sisi handily defeat Mousa Mostafa Mousa — the sole challenger who hasn't been jailed or intimidated into dropping out.

The backdrop: Sisi, the former minister of defense and commander-in-chief of the Egyptian Armed Forces, led a military coup to topple President Mohamed Morsi in 2013. He formally came to power in 2014 after winning 96% of the vote in the presidential election, but has since seen his popularity wane under deteriorating economic conditions and an oppressive human rights record.