Photo: Aaron P. Bernstein / Getty Images

President Trump signed two proclamations to impose heightened steel and aluminum tariffs, which will go into effect in two weeks. Lawmakers immediately reacted to the signing; Speaker Paul Ryan said he disagreed with the tariffs, while Sen. Joe Manchin praised them.

Why it matters: While the tariffs are still going to get pushback, they aren't as bad as originally believed. However, the added costs could spark international backlash.

  • House Speaker Paul Ryan: "I disagree with this action and fear its unintended consequences...We will continue to urge the administration to narrow this policy so that it is focused only on those countries and practices that violate trade law."
  • Sen. Jeff Flake: "These so-called ‘flexible tariffs’ are a marriage of two lethal poisons to economic growth – protectionism and uncertainty. Trade wars are not won, they are only lost...I will immediately draft and introduce legislation to nullify these tariffs."
  • Sen. Orrin Hatch: "Simply put: This is a tax hike on American manufacturers, workers & consumers. Slapping aluminum and steel imports with tariffs of this magnitude is misguided..I will continue to work with the administration to revisit this decision."
  • Sen. Dick Durbin: "The sweeping tariffs announced today are like dropping a bomb on a flea. Launching an all-out trade war will alienate the allies we need to actually solve the problem...and could have unintended consequences for American manufacturers who depend on imported materials."
  • Sen. Ben Sasse: “We’re on the verge of a painful and stupid trade war, and that’s bad. This isn't just bad for farmers and ranchers in Nebraska who need to buy a new tractor, it’s also bad for the moms and dads who will lose their manufacturing jobs because fewer people can buy a more expensive product. Temporary exceptions for Canada and Mexico are encouraging but bad policy is still bad policy, and these constant NAFTA threats are nuts.”
  • Sen. Joe Manchin: “People have had unfettered access for a long long time that are able to come here on very low if any types of tariffs, but yet they still have it restricted for us to go. That’s just not right...I'm glad we are finally standing up for ourselves, and I applaud President Trump’s leadership and willingness to hold places like China accountable for the damage they’ve done to our economy."

Go deeper

Updated 25 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 12,009,301 — Total deaths: 548,799 — Total recoveries — 6,561,969Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 3,053,328 — Total deaths: 132,256 — Total recoveries: 953,420 — Total tested: 37,532,612Map.
  3. Public health: Houston mayor cancels Republican convention over coronavirus concerns Deaths are rising in hotspots — Déjà vu sets in as testing issues rise and PPE dwindles.
  4. Travel: United warns employees it may furlough 45% of U.S. workforce How the pandemic changed mobility habits, by state.
  5. Education: New York City schools will not fully reopen in fallHarvard and MIT sue Trump administration over rule barring foreign students from online classes.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: A misinformation "infodemic" is here.

Transcripts show George Floyd told police "I can't breathe" over 20 times

Photo: Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Newly released transcripts of bodycam footage from the Minneapolis Police Department show that George Floyd told officers he could not breathe more than 20 times in the moments leading up to his death.

Why it matters: Floyd's killing sparked a national wave of Black Lives Matter protests and an ongoing reckoning over systemic racism in the United States. The transcripts "offer one the most thorough and dramatic accounts" before Floyd's death, The New York Times writes.

5 hours ago - Health

Fighting the coronavirus infodemic

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

An "infodemic" of misinformation and disinformation has helped cripple the response to the novel coronavirus.

Why it matters: High-powered social media accelerates the spread of lies and political polarization that motivates people to believe them. Unless the public health sphere can effectively counter misinformation, not even an effective vaccine may be enough to end the pandemic.