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Photo: Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

President Trump's niece filed a lawsuit on Thursday alleging that the president and other family members "swindled her" out of an inheritance worth tens of millions, per the suit filed with New York's Supreme Court.

The big picture: Mary Trump's lawsuit, filed two months after her memoir portrayed her uncle as a dangerous sociopath, references a massive 2018 New York Times investigation that found the Trump family reportedly engaged in dubious tax schemes, including outright fraud, in the 1990s.

Details: Trump's sister Maryanne Trump Barry and his younger brother Robert Trump are also named in the lawsuit and accused alongside the president of fraud and civil conspiracy.

What she's saying: "For Donald J. Trump, his sister Maryanne, and their late brother Robert, fraud was not just the family business — it was a way of life," the complaint says, claiming that the family "concocted scheme after scheme to cheat on their taxes, swindle their business partners, and jack up rents on their low-income tenants."

The other side: "The only fraud committed there was Mary Trump recording one of her relatives," White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters Thursday, when asked for comment on the lawsuit.

  • In hours of recordings made secretly by Mary Trump and leaked to the Washington Post, Maryanne Trump Barry said that the president has "no principles," is prone to "lying" and "you can’t trust him."
  • The White House and Trump campaign did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Read the complaint.

Go deeper

Trump signs COVID relief bill, averting government shutdown

Photo: Doug Mills/Getty Images

President Trump signed a bill to extend unemployment benefits and avert a government shutdown, the White House said in an emailed statement Sunday evening.

Details: While Trump signed the current bill providing $600 checks for most Americans hours before a midnight government shutdown deadline, he is continuing his push to bring that amount to $2,000, as Axios reported earlier.

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

54 mins ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council Director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.