President Trump was escorted out of a coronavirus press briefing by a Secret Service agent on Monday evening after law enforcement reportedly shot an armed suspect outside of the White House.

What's new: The 51-year-old suspect approached a uniformed Secret Service officer on the corner of 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW, near the White House, and said he had a weapon, the agency alleged in a statement late Monday. He "ran aggressively towards the officer, and in a drawing motion, withdrew the object from his clothing."

"He then crouched into a shooter’s stance, as if about to fire a weapon. The Secret Service officer discharged his weapon, striking the individual in the torso. Officers immediately rendered first aid to the suspect. Both the suspect and the officer were transported to local hospitals."
— Excerpt from Secret Service statement
  • The White House complex was not breached, per the Secret Service.
  • The Secret Service will conduct an internal review into the incident, which is also being investigated by the Metropolitan Police Department — a standard protocol in such situations.

Of note: Trump returned to the podium some 10 minutes after leaving and informed reporters of the news. He confirmed the suspect had been taken to the hospital.

  • The president praised the Secret Services agents, saying they do a "fantastic job" and he feels "very safe" with their protection.

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

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