Mar 28, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump says he advises coronavirus task force not to contact unappreciative governors

President Trump briefs reports at the White House on March 27. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

"If they don't treat you right, I don't call," President Trump told reporters at the White House coronavirus task force briefing on Friday, referring to U.S. governors battling the spread of COVID-19.

What he's saying: Trump said that while "generally speaking," the nation's governors have been appreciative of his administration's efforts to combat the spread of COVID-19, there are some — including Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer — who the task force should not bother contacting.

  • "All I want them to do, very simple, I want them to be appreciative. I don't want them to say things that aren't true, I want them to be appreciative. We've done a great job," Trump said on Friday.
  • When discussing Vice President Mike Pence's efforts on the task force, Trump said: "He calls all the governors, I tell him, I mean I'm a different type of person, I say Mike, don't call the governor of Washington, you're wasting your time with him. Don't call the woman in Michigan ... if they don't treat you right, I don't call. He's a different type of person."
  • The White House declined to comment.

Flashback: Trump singled out Inslee and Whitmer during an interview with Fox News' Sean Hannity on Thursday, saying neither of them were doing enough to tackle COVID-19, the New York Times reports.

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo rebutted Trump’s comments on Friday that Washington state had overlooked thousands of ventilators found in storage, the Times reports.

Driving the news: Some of the latest federal efforts to offset the medical and economic fallout from COVID-19 are a $2.2 trillion stimulus package signed into law by Trump on Friday, and the appointment of White House trade adviser Peter Navarro to enforce the Defense Production Act.

Go deeper: Trump signs $2 trillion relief bill as U.S. coronavirus case count tops 100,000

Go deeper

Updated 6 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

Florida reported on Wednesday its largest number of new novel coronavirus cases in a single day since April 17. 1,317 people tested positive to take the state total to 58,764, per the state's health department. Despite the rise, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said bars and clubs could reopen on Friday.

By the numbers: More than 107,000 Americans have died of the coronavirus and over 1.8 million people have tested positive, per data from Johns Hopkins. More than 479,000 Americans have recovered and over 18 million tests have been conducted.

Coronavirus hospitalizations keep falling

Data: COVID Tracking Project, Harvard Global Health Institute; Note: Alabama, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Nebraska, Tennessee and Puerto Rico have not reported hospitalizations consistently. Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 continues to decline, particularly in New York and other northeastern states that were among the hardest hit by the virus.

Yes, but: Some states are still recording stagnant or rising amounts of hospitalizations.

Trump's troubles grow, spread

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

President Trump is confronting the most dire political environment of his presidency, with his support dropping fast from Texas to Wisconsin, even among his base of religious and older voters. 

Why it matters: Top Republicans tell Axios that Trump's handling of the nation's civil unrest, including his hasty photo op at St. John's Church after the violent clearing of Lafayette Park, make them much more worried about his chance of re-election than they were one week ago.