Document scan provided by U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee. Photo Illustration: Axios Visuals

The whistleblower report holds one central allegation: President Trump used his office to push Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and his White House covered up the paper trail.

The big picture: The report chronicles events around the July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to allege a pattern of Trump administration misbehavior.

Before the call, multiple U.S. officials told the whistleblower that they were "deeply concerned by what they viewed as Mr. Giuliani's circumvention of national security decisionmaking processes."

  • The White House response to the call: White House officials allegedly "intervened to 'lock down' all records of the call" and place the transcript in a classified system, even though it didn't contain sensitive national security information.
  • A day after the call: The whistleblower said that the U.S. envoy to Ukraine and the U.S. ambassador to the EU met with Ukrainian officials and provided them with advice on how to "navigate" Trump's demand.
  • And on Ukraine's end: Multiple U.S. officials told the whistleblower that Ukrainian leadership was "led to believe" that a phone call or meeting between Trump and Zelensky would depend on whether Zelensky showed a willingness to "play ball" on the issues aired by Ukraine's Prosecutor General Yuriy Lutsenko and Rudy Giuliani — i.e. investigating Joe Biden.

Between the lines: Expect a bunch of attention — and even some hearings — on the allegation found in the report's appendix.

  • "According to White House officials I spoke with, this was 'not the first time' under this Administration that a Presidential transcript was placed into this codeword-level system solely for the purpose of protecting politically sensitive — rather than national security sensitive — information."

What's next: Don't be surprised to see efforts to unmask the whistleblower, even after they followed the proper legal channels.

  • Trump today called for treating the whistleblower and the people who aided them as treasonous spies.
  • "We used to handle it a little differently than we do now," he said. (Audio).

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 42 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Ex-FDA chief: Pence campaigning after COVID exposure puts others at risk — Mark Meadows: "We are not going to control the pandemic"— COVID-19 looms over White House Halloween celebrations.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week — Fauci says maybe we should mandate masks if people don't wear them — America was sick well before it ever got COVID-19.
  3. World: Italy tightens restrictions Spain declares new state of emergency.
Updated 47 mins ago - Health

13 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

13 states set new highs last week for coronavirus infections recorded in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project (CTP) and state health departments. Kansas, Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming surpassed records from the previous week.

The big picture: The pandemic is getting worse again across the country, and daily coronavirus cases have risen in the U.S. for six straight weeks, according to a seven-day average tracked by Axios. The U.S. reported over 80,000 new cases on both Friday and Saturday.

Senate advances Amy Coney Barrett nomination, setting up final confirmation vote

Photo: Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images

The Senate voted 51-48 on Sunday to advance the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, setting up a final confirmation vote for Monday.

Why it matters: It's now virtually inevitable that the Senate will vote to confirm President Trump's third Supreme Court nominee before the election, which is just nine days away.