May 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump's personal valet tests positive for coronavirus

Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

The White House confirmed on Thursday that a member of the U.S. Navy who serves as one of President Trump's personal valets has tested positive for coronavirus, CNN reports.

Why it matters: Trump and Vice President Mike Pence both tested negative after being told about their potential exposure, but the episode illustrates how close the virus can get to the president even with precautions in place.

The big picture: White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany argued at a press briefing Wednesday that the notion of every American frequently being tested for the virus is "simply nonsensical."

  • However, the White House's method of contact tracing and rapid testing with its 15-minute Abbott Labs test in order to protect Trump and Pence is precisely what many experts say could allow life to return to normal if executed at scale.
  • The problem remains that the U.S. still has limited testing capacity, and that testing is generally reserved for vulnerable Americans and those who present symptoms.

Go deeper: White House unveils coronavirus testing plan

Go deeper

Coronavirus cases spike in Texas, Oregon and Arizona

Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise, Naema Ahmed/Axios

Texas, Arizona and Oregon saw significant spikes last week in new coronavirus infections, while cases also continued to climb in a handful of states where steady increases have become the norm.

Why it matters: Nationwide, new cases have plateaued over the past week. To get through this crisis and safely continue getting back out into the world, we need them to go down — a lot.

12 hours ago - Health

HHS requests data on race and ethnicity with coronavirus test results

A nurse writes a note as a team of doctors and nurses performs a procedure on a coronavirus patient in the Regional Medical Center on May 21 in San Jose, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.

Updated 10 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.