President Trump speaking at Arlington National Cemetary. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump yesterday signed a bill that aims to expand veterans' access to private health care, but the Washington Post reports that the administration is quietly trying to kill the Senate effort to fund it. 

The big picture: Increasing veterans' access to private care emerged as key to addressing the 2014 VA crisis, but it's also sparked a huge debate over how far this access should go.

  • Some lawmakers, along with veterans groups, worry that using federal VA funding for private care could stretch the program's resources even further, as private care often costs more than VA services, Axios' Caitlin Owens writes.

Between the lines: The GOP base was furious with the $1.3 trillion spending bill passed earlier this year, so the White House is hesitant to spend more money. It's encouraging lawmakers to cut spending in other areas instead of appropriating an additional $50 billion to pay for the veterans bill signed yesterday. 

Yes, but: This could play into fears that private care expansion will reduce the VA's ability to serve veterans, as cuts to pay for the private care could come from within the VA itself.

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Biden has huge cash advantage over Trump as Election Day nears

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Wilmington, Delaware, on Monday. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden had $177.3 million in the bank at the end of September, per the latest Federal Election Commission filings.

Why it matters: President Trump's re-election campaign reported having $63.1 million in the bank at the end of last month, as campaigning enters the final stretch ahead of Election Day on Nov. 3.

Court allows North Carolina mail-in ballots deadline extension

An absentee ballot election worker stuffs ballot applications at the Mecklenburg County Board of Elections office in Charlotte, North Carolina, in September. Photo: Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

North Carolina can accept absentee ballots that are postmarked Nov. 3, Election Day, until Nov. 12, a federal appeals court decided Tuesday in a 12-3 majority ruling.

Why it matters: The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals' ruling against state and national Republican leaders settles a lawsuit brought by a group representing retirees, and it could see scores of additional votes counted in the key battleground state.