Photo: Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

President Trump called out former Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a Wednesday tweet as he heads to a runoff election to reclaim his Alabama Senate seat after Super Tuesday's primary.

"This is what happens to someone who loyally gets appointed Attorney General of the United States & then doesn’t have the wisdom or courage to stare down & end the phony Russia Witch Hunt. Recuses himself on FIRST DAY in office, and the Mueller Scam begins!"

Why it matters: Sessions held the seat for nearly two decades and has mentioned his Trump ties during the campaign — though the president has painted a completely different picture on social media.

  • Trump also retweeted an AP story that Sessions' challenger Tommy Tuberville, the former Auburn University football coach, had advanced to the runoff.
  • With over 90% of the vote counted, Sessions, at 31.6%, was set to finish just behind Tuberville's 33.4%.
  • It proves how the president's support can be make-or-break for Republican campaigns across the country — especially in heated primaries.

What's next: Sessions and Tuberville will face off in the runoff on March 31. The winner will challenge Democratic Sen. Doug Jones, considered one of the most vulnerable Democrats in the Senate, in the general election.

Go deeper...Super Tuesday: What you need to know

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New York City schools will not fully reopen in fall

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced at a press conference on Wednesday that schools will not fully reopen in fall, and will instead adopt a hybrid model that will limit in-person attendance to just one to three days a week.

Why it matters: New York City, once the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in the United States, is home to the nation's largest public school district — totaling 1,800 schools and 1.1 million students, according to the New York Times. The partial reopening plan could prevent hundreds of thousands of parents from fully returning to work.

Treasury blames lenders for PPP disclosure debacle

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The U.S. Treasury Department is pointing the finger at lenders for errors discovered in Monday's PPP data disclosure.

What they're saying: "Companies listed had their PPP applications entered into SBA’s Electronic Transmission (ETran) system by an approved PPP lender. If a lender did not cancel the loan in the ETran system, the loan is listed," a senior administration official said.

Updated 46 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 a.m. ET: 11,863,477 — Total deaths: 544,949 — Total recoveries — 6,483,402Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 a.m. ET: 2,996,679 — Total deaths: 131,486 — Total recoveries: 936,476 — Total tested: 36,878,106Map.
  3. Public health: Deaths are rising in hotspots — Déjà vu sets in as testing issues rise and PPE dwindles.
  4. Travel: How the pandemic changed mobility habits, by state.
  5. Education: Harvard and MIT sue Trump administration over rule barring foreign students from online classes.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: A misinformation "infodemic" is here.