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Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

President Trump argued in a tweet Sunday that the Senate holding an impeachment trial based on what he claims is "no evidence," rather than dismissing the trial altogether, "gives the partisan Democrat Witch Hunt credibility that it otherwise does not have."

The big picture: The White House has worked in close coordination with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in organizing the parameters of the Senate trial. Despite House Speaker Nancy Pelosi withholding the articles of impeachment for three weeks in an attempt to get more "fair" trial terms, the proceedings are expected to be favorable to Trump, with no vote on witnesses until after opening arguments.

What he's saying:

"Many believe that by the Senate giving credence to a trial based on the no evidence, no crime, read the transcripts, “no pressure” Impeachment Hoax, rather than an outright dismissal, it gives the partisan Democrat Witch Hunt credibility that it otherwise does not have. I agree!"
— Trump tweeted

Earlier in the day, Trump lamented how the "stigma" of impeachment is now part of his legacy — a talking point that Pelosi herself used in an interview on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday.

  • "Why should I have the stigma of Impeachment attached to my name when I did NOTHING wrong?" Trump tweeted. "Read the Transcripts! A totally partisan Hoax, never happened before. House Republicans voted 195-0, with three Dems voting with the Republicans. Very unfair to tens of millions of voters!"
  • Axios reported in October that Trump believes impeachment could help him get re-elected, but that he was concerned that history would record him as one of only three impeached presidents.

Go deeper: Pelosi says she doesn't regret decision to hold articles of impeachment

Go deeper

4 mins ago - Health

A safe, sane survival guide

Photo: Luka Dakskobler/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

We all know, it’s getting worse.

Reality check: Here are a few things every one of us can do to stay safe and sane in coming months:

Biden’s nightmare debut

President-elect Biden speaks in Wilmington on Nov. 24. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

A dim, gloomy scene seems increasingly set for Joe Biden's debut as president.

The state of play: He'll address — virtually — a virus-weary nation, with record-high daily coronavirus deaths, a flu season near its peak, restaurants and small businesses shuttered by wintertime sickness and spread.

Using apps to prevent deadly police encounters

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Mobile phone apps are evolving in ways that can stop rather than simply document deadly police encounters with people of color — including notifying family and lawyers about potential violations in real time.

Why it matters: As states and cities face pressure to reform excessive force policies, apps that monitor police are becoming more interactive, gathering evidence against rogue officers as well as posting social media videos to shame the agencies.