Oct 10, 2019

Trump says Trey Gowdy can't join legal team until January

Trey Gowdy. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on the White House lawn Thursday that former South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy can't join his legal team until January because of federal lobbying rules.

Why it matters: Trump's lawyer Jay Sekulow confirmed on Wednesday that Gowdy had agreed to operate as Trump's outside counsel as the president faces an impeachment inquiry led by House Democrats. However, the House committees conducting the investigation are already moving full steam ahead with subpoenas and witness depositions and are likely to vote on articles of impeachment before the end of the year.

Go deeper: Trey Gowdy agrees to serve as outside counsel for Trump

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House plans to formalize impeachment procedures this week

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House will vote on a resolution Thursday that will formalize procedures for the next phase of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump, Speaker Nancy Pelosi confirmed on Monday.

Why it matters: Trump and his allies have argued that the current impeachment inquiry is unconstitutional because it hasn't been voted on by the full House — a claim that Pelosi and Democratic leaders have called baseless. However, in a letter to House Democrats Monday, Pelosi wrote that members will vote in order to "eliminate any doubt as to whether the Trump Administration may withhold documents, prevent witness testimony, disregard duly authorized subpoenas, or continue obstructing the House of Representatives."

Go deeperArrowOct 28, 2019

Pence tells House committees he will not cooperate in impeachment inquiry

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The counsel for Vice President Mike Pence sent a letter to the chairmen of the House committees investigating President Trump and Ukraine on Tuesday informing them that he will not cooperate with a request for documents in their "self-proclaimed" impeachment inquiry.

Why it matters: This is in line with the White House's current stance of blanket noncooperation, which has prompted the House chairmen conducting the investigation to warn that defiance could be used as evidence of obstruction in a future article of impeachment. Some have speculated that Speaker Nancy Pelosi could call the White House's bluff and announce a full House vote authorizing the impeachment inquiry, daring the administration to continue to defy subpoenas and document requests.

Impeached and re-elected

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

It’s looking more likely by the day that President Trump will be impeached by the House for his dealings with Ukraine. But if he is acquitted by the Senate — and then goes on to win a second term — Democrats will face a predicament neither party has confronted in U.S. history.

Why it matters: If Trump survives politically and is re-elected to serve another four years, Congress likely would have nowhere left to go in the event of another scandal, legal and political experts say — not because the House couldn’t impeach him again, but because it might be politically impossible to do so.

Go deeperArrowOct 10, 2019