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President Trump said Monday that TikTok will be shut down in the U.S. if it hasn't been bought by Microsoft or another company by Sept. 15, and argued — without elaborating — that the U.S. Treasury should get "a very substantial portion" of the sale fee.

Why it matters: Trump appears to have backed off his threat to immediately ban TikTok after speaking with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, who said Sunday that the company will pursue discussions with TikTok’s Chinese parent company ByteDance to purchase the app in the U.S.

The big picture: TikTok has come under intense scrutiny in the U.S. due to concerns that the vast amounts of data it collects could be accessed by the Chinese government, potentially posing a national security threat.

  • Negotiations between TikTok and Microsoft will be overseen by a special government panel called the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), Reuters reports.

What he's saying: Trump appeared to suggest on Monday that Microsoft would have to pay the U.S. government in order to complete the deal, but did not explain the precedent for such an action. He also argued that Microsoft should buy all of TikTok, not just 30% of the company.

  • "I don't mind if, whether it's Microsoft or somebody else, a big company, a secure company, a very American company, buy it. It's probably easier to buy the whole thing than to buy 30% of it. How do you do 30%? Who's going to get the name? The name is hot, the brand is hot," Trump said.
  • "A very substantial portion of that price is going to have to come into the Treasury of the United States. Because we're making it possible for this deal to happen. Right now they don't have any rights, unless we give it to them. So if we're going to give them the rights, it has to come into this country. It's a little bit like the landlord/tenant," he added.

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Dan Primack: Trump's inexplicable claim that part of Microsoft's purchase price would have to go to the Treasury is skating very close to announcing extortion.

Go deeper: A wild weekend for Microsoft's play for TikTok

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Nov 10, 2020 - Economy & Business

The winners and losers in the market's vaccine rally

Reproduced from Charles Schwab; Chart: Axios Visuals

Risk assets had a very good day on Monday, but U.S. stock performance was mixed after news that a COVID-19 vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech could be distributed to millions of people before the end of the month.

Why it matters: Beyond just stocks, Monday's market moves clearly reflected investor enthusiasm and a market pricing in a return to pre-pandemic life that will benefit risk at the expense of safety.

Stalemate over filibuster freezes Congress

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell's inability to quickly strike a deal on a power-sharing agreement in the new 50-50 Congress is slowing down everything from the confirmation of President Biden's nominees to Donald Trump's impeachment trial.

Why it matters: Whatever final stance Schumer takes on the stalemate, which largely comes down to Democrats wanting to use the legislative filibuster as leverage over Republicans, will be a signal of the level of hardball we should expect Democrats to play with Republicans in the new Senate.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Biden opts for five-year extension of New START nuclear treaty with Russia

Putin at a military parade. Photo: Valya Egorshin/NurPhoto via Getty

President Biden will seek a five-year extension of the New START nuclear arms control pact with Russia before it expires on Feb. 5, senior officials told the Washington Post.

Why it matters: The 2010 treaty is the last remaining constraint on the arsenals of the world's two nuclear superpowers, limiting the number of deployed nuclear warheads and the bombers, missiles and submarines which can deliver them.