Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Trump administration will soon make it easier for federally funded adoption agencies to reject same-sex couples, Axios' Sam Baker and Jonathan Swan reported on Friday.

The big picture: In just 2 years, the Trump administration has worked to undo a major chunk of the protections the LGBTQ community secured under President Obama.

  • Rolled back an Obama-era order allowing transgender people to openly serve in the U.S. military.
  • Proposed rolling back protections for transgender people established under the Affordable Care Act.
  • Told the Supreme Court last year that federal law doesn't protect transgender people from workplace discrimination.
  • Will make it easier for religious health care workers to object to providing care and procedures that conflict with their religious or moral beliefs, potentially putting gay and transgender patients at risk.
  • Would weaken protections for homeless transgender people, including allowing HUD-funded shelters to deny them access or force transgender women to share quarters and bathrooms with men.
  • Removed Title IX protections for transgender youth ensuring they had access to bathrooms and facilities of their choice.
  • Changed an Obama-era policy allowing prisoners to be housed based on their gender identity.

Between the lines: This fits under Trump’s social conservative — religious liberty — agenda and is a big reason why he has such strong support from evangelical Christians who voted for him in record numbers in 2016.

  • Swan emails: Despite being held as suspect by social conservatives when he first ran for president — due to his pro-choice background and donations to liberal Democrats — Trump has arguably been a more socially conservative president than any in recent memory.

The bottom line: The growing power of the presidency means that, for large portions of the American population, losing — or gaining — legal protections is just an election away.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Chris Christie: Wear a mask "or you may regret it — as I did" — Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted relief bill.
  2. Business: New state unemployment filings fall.
  3. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  4. Health: FDA approves Gilead's remdesivir as a coronavirus treatment How the pandemic might endMany U.S. deaths were avoidable.
  5. Education: Boston and Chicago send students back home for online learning.
  6. World: Spain and France exceed 1 million cases.

Early voting eclipses 2016 total with 12 days until election

People stand in line to vote early in Fairfax, Virginia in September. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Americans have cast more than 47.1 million ballots in the 2020 presidential election, surpassing the total early-vote count for 2016 with 12 days left until Election Day, according to a Washington Post analysis of voting data.

Why it matters: The election is already underway, as many states have expanded early and mail-in voting options because of the coronavirus pandemic.

What to expect from the final debate of the 2020 election

Trump and Biden at the first debate. Morry Gash-Pool/Getty Image

Watch for President Trump to address Joe Biden as “the big guy” or “the chairman” at tonight's debate as a way of dramatizing the Hunter Biden emails. Hunter's former business partner Tony Bobulinski is expected to be a Trump debate guest.

The big picture: Trump's advisers universally view the first debate as a catastrophe — evidenced by a sharp plunge in Trump’s public and (more convincingly for them) private polling immediately following the debate.