Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

President Trump told the White House pool Wednesday that he will be "signing something in a little while" on immigration, adding that he wants "to keep families together."

Why it matters: Trump met with Republican lawmakers on Capitol Hill last night to address the mounting pressure on his administration to change its policy of separating migrant children from their families at the border. Trump has previously signaled that he wants more comprehensive reform rather than a separate measure.

The details: The order will call for families to be kept in detention, indefinitely, together, and will not be released until their hearing, the New York Time’s Maggie Haberman and Michael Shear report. It would attempt to work around a court ruling that prevented children from being held in detention for more than three weeks.

What to watch: Currently, parents are initially being taken into criminal custody by the Justice Department, forcing the separation of families. The executive order must also address the processes behind DOJ’s enforcement of the “zero-tolerance” policy.

What Trump's saying:

  • "So I'm going to be signing an executive order in a little while... [W]e're keeping families together but we have to keep our borders strong. We will be overrun with crime and with people that should not be in our country," Trump said, according to the pool.
  • Trump also re-emphasized that, "We need the Democrats' support" in order to pass immigration laws.
"If you're really, really pathetically weak, the country is going to be overrun with millions of people, but if you're strong, you have no heart. That's a tough dilemma."
  • He added that "perhaps I'd rather be strong."
  • He also blamed the situation on federal judges who have stopped the administration's efforts to end the DACA program: "That's why we're in this mess. Because we had a couple of court decisions, which is going to force an issue to the Supreme Court which shouldn't be forced to the Supreme Court."

Be smart: A senior administration official told Axios' Jonathan Swan and Mike Allen that Trump "doesn't want to look weak" by backing down. "He feels boxed in, is frustrated and knows it's bad politics — but also understands it's not a fight he can back down from," the official said.

Go deeper: Here's what happens when families cross the border

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Venezuela's predictable elections herald an uncertain future

The watchful eyes of Hugo Chávez on an election poster in Caracas. Photo: Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty

Venezuelans will go to the polls on Sunday, Nicolás Maduro will complete his takeover of the last opposition-held body, and much of the world will refuse to recognize the results.

The big picture: The U.S. and dozens of other countries have backed an opposition boycott of the National Assembly elections on the grounds that — given Maduro's tactics (like tying jobs and welfare benefits to voting), track record, and control of the National Electoral Council — they will be neither free nor fair.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.