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Photo: Tasos Katopodis, Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

The latest book on the White House will be harder to shake off, even as President Trump claims parts of it "could be just made up by the author."

Why it matters: It's not normal for a president's team to fear he's a national security risk, as Bob Woodward's book claims — or to keep information from his desk and ignore his orders.

Among Woodward's reported revelations:

  • Gary Cohn and Rob Porter stole or hid documents from Trump's desk, including a draft letter that would have withdrawn the U.S. from a trade agreement with South Korea.
  • James Mattis ignored Trump's request to kill Bashar al-Assad in April of 2017. (In a statement, Mattis denied Woodward's claims about him, calling them "a product of someone’s rich imagination.”)
  • John Dowd told Trump he'd be wearing an "orange jump suit" if he dared testify to Mueller. (Dowd told Axios he didn't call Trump a "fucking liar," as Woodward reported.)
  • Trump called Jeff Sessions "mentally retarded" and "a dumb Southerner" who "couldn’t even be a one-person country lawyer down in Alabama."
  • John Kelly called Trump "an idiot" who had "gone off the rails... This is the worst job I’ve ever had." (In a statement, Kelly denied calling Trump an idiot.)

The White House response, via Sarah Sanders: "This book is nothing more than fabricated stories, many by former disgruntled employees, told to make the President look bad. ... Sometimes it is unconventional, but he always gets results."

Between the lines, from Axios' Jonathan Swan:

  • The response is slow and muted compared to their thermonuclear response to the Michael Wolff book (though there's still time, of course!)
  • The fact they explicitly say that Trump's style is unconventional and often isn't pretty reads as a tacit acknowledgement that at least some of the key stories are true.

Be smart, via Swan: The White House's core problem is that Woodward is a serious reporter with decades of thorough reporting under his belt.

  • Unlike the very sloppy Michael Wolff, you can trust that Woodward has gone to inordinate lengths to get to the best obtainable version of the truth. It will be hard to credibly dismiss this as "fake news."

The bottom line: There's a reason the White House hasn't gone all in on Woodward. They can't.

Editor's note: This story has been updated to reflect the statement released by Secretary Mattis.

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Go deeper

30 mins ago - Health

CDC updates guidance on airborne COVID-19

A patron eats lunch in March at Philippe The Original near downtown Los Angeles. Photo: Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The CDC acknowledged Friday that airborne spread of COVID-19 among people more than 6 feet apart "has been repeatedly documented."

Why it matters: This is "a change from the agency’s previous position that most infections were acquired through 'close contact, not airborne transmission,'" the N.Y. Times reports.

11 hours ago - World

Over 170 Palestinians injured in clashes with Israeli police in Jerusalem

An injured man is carried away as Israeli security forces clash with Palestinian protesters at the al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem. Photo: Ahmad Gharabli/AFP via Getty Images

At least 178 Palestinians have been injured in clashes with Israeli police in Jerusalem, Reuters reported late Friday.

The big picture: The clashes come amid growing anger over the threatened eviction of Palestinians from their homes on land claimed by Jewish settlers in East Jerusalem. Tensions have also escalated in the occupied West Bank in recent weeks.

Updated 13 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases hit a seven-month low — Majority back vaccine proof requirements for travel, schools and work — The race to avoid a possible "monster" COVID variant.
  2. Politics: Oklahoma secures $2.6 million refund for hydroxychloroquine purchase — Why Biden's latest vaccine goal is his hardest yet.
  3. Vaccines: Pfizer begins application for full FDA approval of COVID-19 vaccine — Moderna says its COVID booster shot shows promise against variants.
  4. Economy: U.S. adds just 266,000 jobs in April, far below expectations — Americans' return to the skies could benefit smaller airlines.
  5. World: WHO authorizes China's Sinopharm COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use — Mixed response in Europe to Biden's vaccine patents bombshell.
  6. Variant tracker: Where different strains are spreading.