President Trump at the White House on June 26. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Republican satisfaction with the way things are going in the U.S. has dropped significantly since April, falling close to Democratic dissatisfaction, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center.

Why it matters: Until June 30, Republican satisfaction with the state of the country had stayed above 50% for nearly all of Trump’s presidency, according to Pew. The latest survey shows 19% of Republicans and those who lean Republican are satisfied with the direction of the country, compared to 7% of Democrats and those who lean Democrat.

The big picture: President Trump's steady approval ratings within the Republican Party may be eroding as unemployment claims persist and coronavirus infections surge in most of the country. His response to protests against racial injustice earlier this month has also left top Republicans uneasy about his re-election prospects.

By the numbers: Joe Biden is leading Trump 54% to 44% when it comes to voter preference, with strong advantages over the incumbent in terms of temperament and empathy.

  • 63% of Republicans say they feel angry about the state of the U.S., while nearly 78% of Democrats report the same.
  • 56% of Republicans say they are fearful about the state of the country, while 75% of Democrats report the same — marking a wider partisan split.
  • Only one quarter of Republicans told Pew that they felt proud when thinking about the country in its current state.

Flashback: 74% of Americans said in an AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll earlier this month that the country is heading in the wrong direction, including 63% of Republicans — up from 42% in May.

Methodology: 4,708 adults — including 3,577 registered voters — surveyed in June 16-22 through a national, random sampling in Pew’s American Trends Panel (ATP). MOE ± 1.8 percentage points.

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Jun 29, 2020 - Health

Poll: 30% of Americans say they trust Trump to get facts right on coronavirus

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30% of Americans say they trust President Trump and his administration to "get the facts right" on the coronavirus — a lower mark than respondents gave the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (64%), their state governments (53%), local news (50%) and the news media in general (44%), according to a Pew Research Center poll released Monday.

Why it matters: As the coronavirus surges in states across the country, the largely mistrusted White House has been forced to step back into the spotlight. Vice President Mike Pence hosted his first coronavirus press briefing in weeks on Friday and appeared on CBS News' Face the Nation on Sunday, where he disputed that the new surge is a result of states reopening too quickly.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3:30 p.m. ET: 11,691,068 — Total deaths: 540,062 — Total recoveries — 6,349,542Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3:30 p.m. ET: 2,963,244 — Total deaths: 130,813 — Total recoveries: 924,148 — Total tested: 36,225,015Map.
  3. 2020: Biden releases plan to strengthen coronavirus supply chain.
  4. Congress: Trump administration notifies Congress of intent to withdraw from WHO.
  5. Public health: Fauci says it's a "false narrative" to take comfort in lower coronavirus death rate.
  6. World: Brazil's President Bolsonaro tests positive— India reports third-highest case count in the world.

Biden releases plan to strengthen coronavirus supply chain

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden's campaign released a three-part plan Tuesday to rebuild U.S. supply chains in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, and it's centered around the idea that the country is more vulnerable to global disruptions in spite of President Trump's "America First" rhetoric.

Why it matters: Biden is proposing a way to make sure the U.S. doesn't rely on other countries for personal protective equipment (PPE) and other related medical supplies. That's another way of acknowledging that we're not getting over this health crisis anytime soon.