Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The U.S. will unfreeze at least some of the hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid for El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala that was blocked earlier this year, President Trump tweeted and the State Department announced on Wednesday.

Between the lines: Over the past few months, Acting DHS Secretary Kevin McAleenan — who turned in his resignation last Friday and is currently in El Salvador — has signed asylum agreements with the three nations.

  • The Washington Post's Nick Miroff reports that the reinstated aid will total $143 million.

The big picture: When and how the asylum agreements signed with DHS will be implemented remains unclear, but the deals could force Central American migrants who pass through one of the Northern Triangle countries to first seek asylum there or be sent back once they reach the U.S.

  • The majority of migrants who crossed the border during the crisis this past spring and summer were from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. These nations have some of the highest homicide rates in the world.

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Facing enormous financial pressure and uncertainty around reopenings, media companies are giving up on their years-long building leases for more permanent work-from-home structures. Others are letting employees work remotely for the foreseeable future.

Why it matters: Real estate is often the most expensive asset that media companies own. And for companies that don't own their space, it's often the biggest expense.

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Pinterest set out to be a bright spot in cutthroat Silicon Valley, but now stands to see its reputation forever tarnished by allegations of mistreatment and a toxic culture by women who held senior roles at the company.

Why it matters: Even a company known for progressive policy decisions and successfully combatting hateful and otherwise problematic content isn't immune to the systemic problems that have plagued many tech companies.

Big Tech pushes voter initiatives to counter misinformation

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Tech giants are going all in on civic engagement efforts ahead of November's election to help protect themselves in case they're charged with letting their platforms be used to suppress the vote.

Why it matters: During the pandemic, there's more confusion about the voting process than ever before. Big tech firms, under scrutiny for failing to stem misinformation around voting, want to have concrete efforts they can point to so they don't get blamed for letting an election be manipulated.