Jun 21, 2018

Read Trump’s proposal for reorganizing the federal government

Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

President Trump will unveil his administration's plan to reorganize the federal government during a Cabinet meeting this afternoon, including plans to merge the Departments of Education and Labor into a single agency and rename the Department of Health and Human Services to the Department of Health and Public Welfare.

Be smart: This massive proposed shakeup, titled “Delivering Government Solutions in the 21st Century: Reform Plan and Reorganization Recommendations,” will face significant opposition in Congress, as the reshuffling will make it easier to cut and revise several domestic agencies. Similar efforts in the past have failed due to pushback.

Key changes, outlined on page 15 of the proposal:

  • "Merge the Departments of Education and Labor into a single Cabinet agency, the Department of Education and the Workforce."
  • "Move the non-commodity nutrition assistance programs currently in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service into the Department of Health and Human Services — which will be renamed the Department of Health and Public Welfare."
  • "Move the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Civil Works out of the Department of Defense (DOD) to the Department of Transportation (DOT) and Department of the Interior (DOI)."
  • "Reorganize the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and the food safety functions of HHS’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) into a single agency within USDA."
  • "Move USDA’s rural housing loan guarantee and rental assistance programs to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)."
  • "Consolidate the Department of Energy’s (DOE) applied energy programs into a new Office of Energy Innovation."

Axios is posting this because we received the proposal from an outside source and never agreed to an embargo.

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