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President Trump on July 10 in Doral, Florida. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump on Friday said he is no longer confident about negotiating a phase-two trade deal with China, noting that the coronavirus pandemic has damaged the countries' already-strained relationship.

Why it matters: The president's remarks throw both the future of the U.S.-China trade war and the first phase of the deal that the two countries signed in January into limbo.

What they're saying: “I don’t think about it now,” Trump told reporters on Air Force One Friday in response to questions about phase two of the pact, per a White House pooler.

  • The president added that the U.S.' “relationship with China has been severely damaged. They could have stopped the plague, they could have stopped it, they didn’t stop it. They stopped it from going into the remaining portions of China from Wuhan province. They could have stopped the plague, they didn’t."

The big picture: Trump and administration officials have publicly disagreed on the status of the phase-one agreement.

  • Trump said the trade deal was still "fully intact" in June, while White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said it was effectively dead the same day, the New York Times reports.
  • Congress and the Trump administration have announced sanctions against Beijing officials in response to the Chinese government's implementation of Hong Kong's national security law and the country's Uighur human rights abuses in Xinjiang.

Go deeper: FBI director says China aims to become "world's only superpower"

Go deeper

The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said last week that he cannot support President Trump's re-election.

Why it matters: Hogan, a moderate governor in a blue state, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

How Biden might tackle the Iran deal

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Four more years of President Trump would almost certainly kill the Iran nuclear deal — but the election of Joe Biden wouldn’t necessarily save it.

The big picture: Rescuing the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) is near the top of Biden's foreign policy priority list. He says he'd re-enter the deal once Iran returns to compliance, and use it as the basis on which to negotiate a broader and longer-lasting deal with Iran.

Kamala Harris, the new left's insider

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Joe Buglewicz/Getty Images     

Progressive leaders see Sen. Kamala Harris, if she's elected vice president, as their conduit to a post-Biden Democratic Party where the power will be in younger, more diverse and more liberal hands.

  • Why it matters: The party's rising left sees Harris as the best hope for penetrating Joe Biden's older, largely white inner circle.

If Biden wins, Harris will become the first woman, first Black American and first Indian American to serve as a U.S. vice president — and would instantly be seen as the first in line for the presidency should Biden decide against seeking a second term.