Apr 28, 2017

Trump: people get nervous when I press my red button

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Good morning, Day 99! A save-that-tape moment during a Reuters interview with President Trump reminds us: For all the century's worth of news we have had under President Trump, there has yet to be a massive, transcendent crisis — foreign or domestic — to test him, his team and this divided nation.

Trump told Reuters' Stephen Adler, Steve Holland and Jeff Mason: "There is a chance that we could end up having a major, major conflict with North Korea. Absolutely."

  • "We'd love to solve things diplomatically but it's very difficult."
  • On North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, now 33: "He's 27. His father dies, took over a regime. So say what you want but that is not easy, especially at that age. I'm not giving him credit or not giving him credit, I'm just saying that's a very hard thing to do. As to whether or not he's rational, I have no opinion on it. I hope he's rational."

That pairs nicely with this priceless lead of an interview with Trump in tomorrow's Financial Times Magazine, by Washington bureau chief Demetri Sevastopulo:

"Sitting across from Donald Trump in the Oval Office, my eyes are drawn to a little red button on a box that sits on his desk. 'This isn't the nuclear button, is it?' I joke, pointing. 'No, no, everyone thinks it is,' Trump says ... before leaning over and pressing it to order some Cokes. 'Everyone does get a little nervous when I press that button.'"

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