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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Special counsel Robert Mueller's report explored 10 episodes where actions by President Trump could have been considered obstruction of justice — but then explains why he couldn't reach a conclusion in each case.

The big picture: If you've been wondering what all of this actually adds up to, this is your best place to start. It gives the clearest picture yet of Trump's actions as well as why Mueller didn't take a position on them — though the report comes close to rendering judgment on Trump's attempts to oust Mueller or rein him in.

  • Michael Flynn: In February 2017, Trump talked to then-FBI director James Comey about the investigation of Flynn, saying of the former national security adviser: "I hope you can let this go."
    • Between the lines: Mueller noted that the evidence was "inconclusive" as to whether Trump knew about Flynn's calls to Russian ambassador Sergei Kisylak about the Obama administration's sanctions against Russia.
  • The Russia investigation: Trump reached out to intelligence agency leaders in March and April 2017 about the FBI's Russia investigation.
    • Between the lines: Witnesses had different recollections about whether Trump had specifically asked the agency officials to stop the investigation. The report does note that Trump was angry about the investigation and "concerned about the impact of the Russia investigation on his ability to govern."
  • Comey's firing: When Trump fired Comey in May 2017, it would have qualified as obstruction "if it had the natural and probable effect of interfering with or impeding the investigation," the report stated.
    • Between the lines: The firing didn't stop the investigation, and the report establishes that Trump and his team were aware of that. The report says "substantial evidence" shows that the biggest reason for the firing was that Comey wouldn't say publicly that Trump wasn't under investigation.
  • The attempt to get rid of Mueller: In June 2017, Trump called White House counsel Don McGahn and told him to have Mueller removed as special counsel, arguing that he had conflicts of interest. McGahn refused "for fear of being seen as triggering another Saturday Night Massacre."
    • Between the lines: Mueller notes that it would only count as obstruction if it interfered with the investigation and grand jury proceedings. But even though the probe could continue under someone else, the report stated, "a factfinder would need to consider" whether Trump's action would have delayed the probe or had a chilling effect on a new special counsel.
  • The attempt to curtail Mueller's investigation: Two days after the McGahn incident, Trump told former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski to tell Attorney General Jeff Sessions to limit the Russia investigation to future election interference. Lewandowski never delivered the message.
    • Between the lines: Mueller doesn't really let Trump off the hook here. Limiting the scope of the probe would likely end investigations into Trump's conduct and possible obstruction of justice, the report states, and "the timing and circumstances of the President's actions support the conclusion that he sought that result."
  • Trump Tower meeting: Trump told communications director Hope Hicks and others not to disclose information about the 2016 Trump Tower meeting between campaign officials and a Russian attorney. He also told them to take out a line in a draft statement by Donald Trump Jr. acknowledging that the meeting was with "an individual who I was told might have information helpful to the campaign."
    • Between the lines: "The evidence does not establish" that Trump was trying to prevent Mueller's team or Congress from obtaining the emails setting up the meeting — which is the only way his actions could have been considered obstruction.
  • The attempt to reverse Sessions' recusal: Trump tried to convince Sessions to end his recusal from the Russia probe, take over the Mueller investigation, and investigate Hillary Clinton.
    • Between the lines: The report says a "reasonable inference" would be that Trump "believed that an unrecused Attorney General would play a protective role and could shield the President from the ongoing Russia investigation."
  • Ordering McGahn to deny Mueller firing attempt: In January 2018, Trump tried to convince McGahn to deny that Trump had ordered him to have Mueller removed. McGahn refused, insisting that it was true.
    • Between the lines: Mueller wrote that there is "some evidence" that Trump just remembered the conversation differently ("I never said 'fire'") — but also said "substantial evidence indicates" that Trump was trying to influence McGahn's statements "to deflect or prevent further scrutiny of the President's conduct toward the investigation."
  • Conduct toward Flynn: When Flynn's attorneys said they could no longer share confidential communications with the White House or Trump, Trump's personal lawyer became "indignant and vocal" — according to Flynn's attorneys — and said he interpreted that as "a reflection of Flynn's hostility toward the President."
    • Between the lines: The sequence of events "could have had the potential to affect Flynn's decision to cooperate," the report stated — but "because of privilege issues," Mueller's team couldn't determine whether Trump knew about the exchange with Flynn's lawyers.
  • Conduct toward Michael Cohen: When Trump's former personal lawyer started cooperating with the government — after giving false statements to Congress about the Trump Tower Moscow project — Trump called him a "rat" and hinted that members of his family had committed crimes.
    • Between the lines: Mueller writes that the evidence "does not establish that the President directed or aided Cohen's false testimony" — but it does suggest that he started using "attacks and intimidation" to undermine Cohen after he started cooperating with the government.

The bottom line: Mueller just handed House Democrats enough material to keep them busy for months.

Go deeper

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 9 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.

John Weaver, Lincoln Project co-founder, acknowledges “inappropriate” messages

John Weaver aboard John McCain's campaign plane in February 2000. Photo: Robert Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images)

John Weaver, a veteran Republican operative who co-founded the Lincoln Project, declared in a statement to Axios on Friday that he sent “inappropriate,” sexually charged messages to multiple men.

  • “To the men I made uncomfortable through my messages that I viewed as consensual mutual conversations at the time: I am truly sorry. They were inappropriate and it was because of my failings that this discomfort was brought on you,” Weaver said.
  • “The truth is that I'm gay,” he added. “And that I have a wife and two kids who I love. My inability to reconcile those two truths has led to this agonizing place.”