L: Michael Cohen. Photo: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images. R: Paul Manafort. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen and 2016 Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort each became felons during the 4pm hour this afternoon.

The bottom line: Former Trump allies are going to jail, with no end in sight for the Mueller probe.

In New York, Michael Cohen accepted a plea deal to charges that include campaign finance violations, tax and bank fraud. His sentencing hearing will be on December 12.

  • "The plea agreement does not call for Mr. Cohen to cooperate with federal prosecutors in Manhattan, but it does not preclude him from providing information to the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III," the N.Y. Times reports.
  • Reuters: "Cohen says at direction of 'candidate for federal office' he arranged to make payments 'for principal purpose of influencing election.'"
  • Go deeper: What Michael Cohen knows (Axios)

In Virginia, a jury found Paul Manafort guilty on eight counts of fraud.

  • WashPost: "Manafort was convicted on five counts of filing false tax returns, one count of not filing a required IRS form, and two bank fraud counts."
  • Why it matters: "Manafort’s guilty verdict may strengthen Mueller’s hand as he continues to investigate possible conspiracy and seeks an interview with the president; an acquittal could have led to a broader effort by conservatives to shut down the special counsel’s office."
  • Senate Intel Committee ranking Democrat Mark Warner in a statement: “Any attempt by the President to pardon Mr. Manafort or interfere in the investigation into his campaign would be a gross abuse of power and require immediate action by Congress.”

Go deeper... Mueller’s map: What 35 indictments and pleas tell us

Go deeper

Louisville police declare state of emergency as Breonna Taylor decision looms

A demonstrator holds up a sign of Breonna Taylor during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The Louisville police chief declared in a memo obtained by news outlets a "state of emergency" for the department on Monday to prepare for Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's expected announcement on the Breonna Taylor case.

Of note: Louisville has witnessed more than 115 days of protests over the police killing of Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, with calls for all the officers involved to be charged.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 31,1833,800 — Total deaths: 962,793— Total recoveries: 21,348,410Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 6,833,800 — Total deaths: 199,818 — Total recoveries: 2,615,949 — Total tests: 95,841,281Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Media: Conservative blogger who spread COVID-19 misinformation worked for Fauci's agency.
  5. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  6. World: U.K. upgrades COVID alert level as Europe sees worrying rise in infections — "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.

Sen. Cory Gardner on vacant Supreme Court seat: "I will vote to confirm"

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) will vote to confirm President Trump's nominee to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, he announced in a statement Monday.

Why it matters: The development is a win for President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). It should mean Republicans are all but assured to have enough support to hold hearings for Trump's potential nominee.

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