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During a rare solo press conference Wednesday spanning an hour and twenty-two minutes, President Trump sounded off on issues including Brett Kavanaugh, Rod Rosenstein, North Korea and peace in the Middle East.

One big thing: Trump said he's had "a lot of false charges" made against him and called sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh a "big fat con job." The president declined to respond on whether he believed the accusers, saying Democrats and the third accuser’s lawyer are using the allegations to personally harm Brett Kavanaugh.

On Brett Kavanaugh: Trump says he's open to "changing [his] mind" about his Supreme Court pick if evidence from Kavanaugh's upcoming hearing is compelling.

  • Trump said, when asked if he thought the women accusing Kavanaugh were liars, that he'd see what happens during Thursday's hearings. "It's possible they could be convincing."
  • In a tense exchange with the president, CNN's Jim Acosta asked Trump to call on a female correspondent during his press conference and answer questions on Kavanaugh.

On Kavanaugh's public perception: "In this case you’re guilty until proven innocent. I think that is a very, very dangerous standard for our country."

  • In continuing his attack on Democrats, Trump said "George Washington would be voted against 100% by Schumer and the con artists."
  • "Somebody could come and say, '30 years ago, 25 years ago, 10 years ago, he did a horrible thing... And honestly, it’s a very dangerous period in our country and it’s being perpetrated by very evil people. Some of them are Democrats, I must say, because some of them know that this is a game that they’re playing."

On whether he'll watch Kavanaugh's hearing: "I want to watch. I want to see. I hope I can watch. I'm meeting with a lot of countries tomorrow, but I will certainly in some form be able to watch."

  • On the term "con job": Trump said he's used "much worse" language than con job before. "That's, like, probably the nicest phrase I've ever used."

On the fate of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein: When asked if he planned on firing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, Trump said "we'll see," but his "preference would be to keep him."

On the media: "I think ABC, CBS, NBC, The [New York] Times, The Washington Post, they're all going to endorse me, because if they don't, they're going out of business. Can you imagine if you didn't have me?"

On North Korea and Kim Jong-un: "If I wasn't elected, you'd be in a war....You would've had a war and you would've lost millions, not thousands, millions of people."

On United Nations members laughing at him: "That's fake news, that's fake news. It was covered that way...They were not laughing at me, they were laughing with me."

On soybeans and farmers: Trump called farmers "patriots" and said his policies are creating growth for the soybean industry, but they've fallen 12% year to year.

On Middle East negotiations: "If the Israelis and the Palestinians want one state, that's okay with me. If they want two states, that's okay with me...I want to see if I can get a deal done so that people don't get killed anymore."

Editor's note: This story has been updated to reflect the latest developments.

Go deeper

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations before leaving office

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump plans to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations on his final full day in office Tuesday, sources familiar with the matter told Axios.

Why it matters: This is a continuation of the president's controversial December spree that saw full pardons granted to more than two dozen people — including former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, longtime associate Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father of Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

  • The pardons set to be issued before Trump exits the White House will be a mix of criminal justice ones and pardons for people connected to the president, the sources said.
  • CNN first reported this news.

Go deeper: Convicts turn to D.C. fixers for Trump pardons

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.

The dark new reality in Congress

National Guard troops keep watch at security fencing. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

This is how bad things are for elected officials and others working in a post-insurrection Congress:

  • Rep. Norma Torres (D-Calif.) said she had a panic attack while grocery shopping back home.
  • Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said police may also have to be at his constituent meetings.
  • Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) told a podcaster he brought a gun to his office on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 because he anticipated trouble with the proceedings that day.