Jan 29, 2020

Poll: 75% of Americans say witnesses should testify at impeachment trial

President Trump addresses the World Economic Forum in Davos, Jan. 21. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

75% of registered voters say witnesses should be allowed to testify in President Trump's Senate impeachment trial, a Quinnipiac University poll published Tuesday finds.

Between the lines: 49% of Republicans surveyed say they support having witnesses, a sign that they may be hoping to hear from Hunter Biden on his work in Ukraine more than former national security adviser John Bolton.

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The GOP senators signaling support for witnesses following Bolton report

From left: Sen. Susan Collins, former national security adviser John Bolton, Sen. Mitt Romney. Photos: Getty Images

At least three Republican senators are signaling support for calling John Bolton as a witness in President Trump's Senate impeachment trial, following reports that the former national security adviser's forthcoming book includes allegations that Trump said he conditioned aid to Ukraine on the nation investigating his political rivals.

The state of play: The revelations from Bolton's book could be enough to sway the four Republican senators needed to vote for witness testimony in the trial, GOP sources told Axios on Monday.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jan 30, 2020

Graham argues Bolton shouldn't be witness in Trump impeachment trial

Photo: Getty Images

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said Wednesday that he does not feel additional witnesses are needed in President Trump's impeachment trial — despite the Ukraine-linked revelations from former national security adviser John Bolton's unpublished manuscript.

The state of play: In a statement, Graham argued that "one could assume everything attributable to John Bolton is accurate and still the House case would fall well below the standards to remove a president from office."

Go deeperArrowJan 29, 2020

Trump impeachment trial recap, day 10: Vote to call witnesses fails

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) gives the thumbs up as he leaves the Senate chamber after adjourning for the night during the impeachment trial of U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 31, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer / Staff/Getty Images

The Senate voted Friday to move forward with Trump's impeachment trial without calling for additional witnesses or evidence, an expected result after two key Republicans decided to vote against it.

The state of play: The Senate voted to reconvene Monday at 11 a.m. ET with a final vote Wednesday at 4 p.m., after the Senate goes on recess for the weekend. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer's last-ditch effort to get witnesses — forcing amendments to subpoena John Bolton, Mick Mulvaney and other officials — were shot down.