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Illustration: Alex Wong/Getty Images; Aïda Amer/Axios

The Trump administration is testing a novel strategy for dealing with controversy and possible illegalities: Pretend you have nothing to hide by blurting it out loud. 

Why it matters: President Trump and his aides and allies seem to think that by being unapologetic and admitting things that would have touched off blazing scandals just a few years ago, they can move the goalposts of what's acceptable to Republicans and the public.

We had two doozies yesterday:

1) Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney just said it out loud at a White House briefing, connecting Trump's release of Ukraine aid with an investigation of corruption that included U.S. Democrats.

  • ABC's Jonathan Karl pressed: "[T]o be clear, what you just described is a quid pro quo. It is: Funding will not flow unless the investigation into the Democratic server happens as well."
  • Mulvaney replied: "We do that all the time with foreign policy."
  • This, of course, pulverized Trump's "no quid pro quo" mantra.
  • The subtext of the pivot was: Own it. So what? He's allowed. He's the president. There's no coverup. 
  • Republicans on the Hill couldn't believe it. A House GOP committee source to Axios' Alayna Treene: Mulvaney's "diatribe has blown up the [Gordon] Sondland interview — Democrats are referring to the transcript mid-interview. WTF."
  • After headlines like "White House admits quid pro quo over Ukraine aid," Mulvaney tried to walk back the admission with a statement blaming the press: "Once again, the media has decided to misconstrue my comments to advance a biased and political witch hunt against President Trump. Let me be clear, there was absolutely no quid pro quo between Ukrainian military aid and any investigation into the 2016 election."

2) Amid rising charges of cronyism, Trump awarded one of his own resorts, Trump National Doral near Miami, the lucrative contract for next June's G7 summit.

  • The Miami Herald calls it "a surge of off-season business for the lagging property."
  • Republicans would have howled "self-dealing" if a Democrat did anything like that.

We've seen the shout-it-out-loud strategy before:

  • Trump released the rough transcript of the Ukraine call, the very event that touched off the formal impeachment investigation, and called it "perfect."
  • Trump, accused of asking Ukraine to investigate the Bidens, went on camera and asked Ukraine and China to investigate the Bidens.
  • Trump says he doesn’t care if Russia and Syrian President Bashar Assad move in and take America’s place in northern Syria.

Between the lines ... Last week's gambit was: "There is no whistleblower. There is no impeachment." From nothing to everything. Welcome to "The Trump Show."

Go deeper: Trump’s playbook for planting suspicion

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Go deeper

Trump tells House GOP leader he wants a "big deal" on COVID relief

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Within a day of tweeting that he was calling off bipartisan talks for a coronavirus stimulus deal, President Trump phoned House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and indicated he was worried by the stock market reaction and wanted a "big deal" with Speaker Nancy Pelosi, per two sources familiar with the call.

What we're hearing: Trump was spooked after seeing the instant drop in the stock market and intense backlash to his tweet, and he has since directed Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to push for a more comprehensive relief bill before the election.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Oct 8, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump's stimulus whiplash and the age of cognitive disconnect

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The paradoxes of Trumpism were on full display Tuesday. Over the course of the day, Trump agreed with Fed chair Jay Powell that the need for fiscal stimulus is urgent, requested that Congress fund a new round of stimulus checks — and, at the same time, instructed his Treasury secretary to cease all negotiations on Capitol Hill and put off any stimulus until after the election.

The latest: As Axios' Alayna Treene and Jonathan Swan reported Thursday, Trump phoned House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and indicated he was worried by the stock market reaction and wanted a "big deal" with Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

3 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.