Oct 19, 2019

Trump impeachment inquiry takes its toll on Republicans

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney gives briefing on Thursday. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Some Republicans are newly struggling to support President Trump following his calls to pull troops from Syria, the Ukraine impeachment investigation and decision to host the G-7 summit at his Doral resort, reports the Washington Post.

Why it matters: "There’s now a growing sense among a quiet group of Republicans that the president is playing with fire, taking their loyalty for granted," writes the Post.

The state of play: Rep. Francis Rooney (R-Fla.), asked whether he thinks Trump's conduct is impeachable, said: "I'm still thinking about it."

  • Former Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who ran against Trump in the 2016 primary, said for the first time that he supports impeachment — but still not removal.

In a lunch with Republican colleagues on Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell portrayed Trump's impeachment by the House, and therefore trial by the Senate, as all but inevitable, writes the New York Times.

George Kent, a career State Department official overseeing Ukraine policy, testified Tuesday "that he had raised concerns in early 2015 about then-Vice President Joe Biden’s son serving on the board of a Ukrainian energy company but was turned away by a Biden staffer." per the Washington Post.

Go deeper...Pew survey: 54% approve of House impeachment inquiry

Go deeper

Trump walks to historic St. John's Church outside White House as protests rage

President Trump walked to the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church, located just steps away from the White House across Lafayette Park, on Monday night as protests linked to the murder of George Floyd raged across the capital and cities around the country.

What we're seeing: Military police and park rangers used physical force and tear gas on peaceful protestors to clear the area so that Trump could "pay respects" to the church that was damaged by a fire on Sunday.

Trump threatens to deploy military amid national unrest

President Trump announced from the White House Rose Garden Monday evening that he is "mobilizing all available federal resources, civilian and military" to stop violent protests across the country, decrying "professional anarchists, looters, criminals, antifa and others" whose actions have "gripped" the nation.

The backdrop: Trump's announcement came as police clashed with protesters just outside of the White House, using tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse crowds chanting, "Hands up, don't shoot," and other slogans. Flash bangs used outside the White House could be heard from the Rose Garden.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Autopsies say George Floyd's death was homicide

Police watch as demonstrators block a roadway while protesting the death of George Floyd in Miami. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Preliminary results from an independent autopsy commissioned by George Floyd's family found that his death in the custody of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was "homicide caused by asphyxia due to neck and back compression that led to a lack of blood flow to the brain," according to a statement from the family's attorney.

The latest: An updated official autopsy released by the Hennepin County medical examiner also determined that the manner of Floyd's death was "homicide," ruling it was caused by "cardiopulmonary arrest complicating law enforcement subdued, restraint, and neck compression."