Feb 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump impeachment aides leave White House post-acquittal

President Trump's impeachment gurus, Tony Sayegh and Pam Bondi, are leaving the White House after his acquittal in the Senate.

What we're hearing: Sayegh and Bondi were hired to run an anti-impeachment war room in the midst of the House impeachment investigation, but now that the president has been acquitted, the two plan to return to their former jobs.

  • Sayegh, who had served in a public affairs role for Trump’s Treasury Department and has a close relationship with Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner and Donald Trump Jr., will return to Teneo as a managing director in New York City. Today is his last day at the White House.
  • Bondi, the former Florida attorney general who served as a member of Trump's defense tea​​m​ during the trial​, is due to depart by the end of next week.

Between the lines: Sayegh and Bondi worked behind the scenes to curry favor among Republicans to acquit Trump. But ​their roles were always temporary, and now that they have succeeded in pressuring Republicans to acquit the president they will return to their day jobs.

Yes, but: Both aides plans to visit Washington often and support Trump in outside roles.

Go deeper: The daily highlights from Trump's Senate impeachment trial

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Trump impeachment trial recap, day 6: Defense continues case despite Bolton furor

Alan Dershowitz. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

President Trump's legal team continued its opening arguments on the sixth day of his Senate impeachment trial on Monday.

The big picture: Trump's defense team hit hard on historical precedents, the Bidens, Burisma and the House impeachment managers. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ended the day grinning broadly during Alan Dershowitz's remarks that the articles are not crimes, receiving handshakes from several GOP senators after, in addition to Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.)

Go deeperArrowJan 28, 2020

Trump impeachment trial recap, day 11: Closing arguments conclude

Rep. Adam Schiff at closing arguments. Photo: Senate Television via Getty Images

House managers and President Trump's defense team presented their closing arguments on Monday during the 11th day of the president's Senate impeachment trial.

The state of the play: The four hours of closing arguments were more for show than meant to change any minds, as Trump is all but certain to be acquitted on Wednesday.

Trump's sense of invincibility

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios.

President Trump often says he's the smartest person in the room on virtually every topic. Now, after taking several risks on what he privately calls "big shit" and avoiding catastrophe, Trump and his entire inner circle convey supreme self-confidence, bordering on a sense of invincibility.

The state of play: Three years into Trump's presidency, their view is the naysayers are always wrong. They point to Iran, impeachment, Middle East peace. Every day, Trump grows more confident in his gut and less deterrable. Over the last month, 10 senior administration officials have described this sentiment to me. Most of them share it.