President Trump on Thursday denied responsibility for the "send her back" chant directed at Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) at a North Carolina campaign rally on Wednesday, and falsely claimed that he "started speaking very quickly" to cut off the chant after it began.

REPORTER: Are you concerned with your supporters chanting "Send her back" about Congresswoman Omar, that it puts her in danger?
TRUMP: I have tremendous support. I wasn't happy with that message they gave last night. That was a packed arena. ... I think we have far more support than they do and we have far more energy than they do and we're going to have a very interesting election. But I was not happy when I heard that chant."
REPORTER: Why did they do it?
TRUMP: You would have to ask them. What I would suggest, I was not happy with it, but what I would suggest, you go there, go to North Carolina, and you ask the people why did they say that. But that's what they said.
REPORTER: You'll stop them if they try to do it again?
TRUMP: I didn't like that they did it and I started speaking very quickly. Excuse me. Really? If you would have heard, there was a tremendous amount of noise and action and everything else. I started very quickly. And I think you know that. Maybe you're giving me too much credit.

Reality check: Trump let the chant go on for about 13 seconds before speaking again at the rally on Wednesday night. The chant was indisputably inspired by his racist attacks on Omar and other progressive women of color on Sunday, in which he argued that they should "go back" and help fix the places where they came from instead of criticizing the U.S.

  • Omar, who came to the U.S. as a teenage refugee from Somalia, is the only one of the four lawmakers born outside of the country. She is a naturalized citizen and a democratically-elected member of Congress.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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What they're saying: Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic and Republican lawmakers along with other leading political figures reacted to President Trump's Saturday afternoon nomination of federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

What they're saying: "President Trump could not have made a better decision," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement. "Judge Amy Coney Barrett is an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States."

Amy Coney Barrett: "Should I be confirmed, I will be mindful of who came before me"

Trump introduces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Olivier Douleiry/Getty Images

In speaking after President Trump announced her as the Supreme Court nominee to replaced Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett said on Saturday she will be "mindful" of those who came before her on the court if confirmed.

What she's saying: Barrett touched on Ginsburg's legacy, as well as her own judicial philosophy and family values. "I love the United States and I love the United States Constitution," she said. "I'm truly humbled at the prospect of serving on the  Supreme Court."

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