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President Trump and journalist Piers Morgan. Photo: Mathew Imaging/WireImage

In a wide-ranging interview with Piers Morgan broadcast on "Good Morning Britain" Wednesday, President Trump said he's open to talks with Iran, but wouldn't rule out military action against the country.

"There’s always a chance. Do I want to? No. But there is always a chance."

Highlights: In the interview, recorded in London's Churchill War Rooms on the last day of his state visit, Trump defended his criticisms of Sen. John McCain months after the Arizona senator's death, saying he never thinks about him but people keep raising the issue with him. He reiterated that he was "not a fan" of him. "I didn’t like what he did to health care," he said. "I didn't like how he handled the veterans."

  • Morgan raised the issue of shooting deaths in the U.S. with Trump, who responded by saying there are stabbings "all over" London.
  • He repeated claims he's made previously that the Bataclan theater massacre during the 2015 Paris terrorist attacks wouldn’t have happened if "one or two" concertgoers had a gun.
  • Trump defended his ban on transgender military personnel.
  • He appeared to walk back comments he made at his U.K. news conference in which he said "everything is on the table" in trade talks with the U.K. — including Britain's public health care system, the National Health Service. "That's something I would not consider part of trade," he told Morgan. "That's not trade."
  • The president — who was observing the D-Day 75th anniversary commemorative events with Queen Elizabeth II and other world leaders later Wednesday — paid tribute to World War II leaders, including the late British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.
  • Trump, who didn't serve in the Vietnam War, said he "wouldn’t have minded" fighting in the conflict, and he thinks he makes up for not participating with funding for the military under his administration.
  • He wouldn't reveal what he discussed with Queen Elizabeth II after she asked him not to, but he said he had a "great conversation" with Prince Charles "about, as you would call it, climate change. ... I tell you what moved me is his passion for future generations," he said. "This is real, he believes that, he wants to have a world that is good for future generations and I do, too."
  • Trump denied that climate change is caused by humans, despite the overwhelming scientific consensus: "I believe there's a change in weather, and I think it changes both ways. Don't forget, it used to be called global warming. That wasn't working. Then it was called climate change. Now it's actually called extreme weather."
  • The president clarified remarks he made about Meghan Markle, the duchess of Sussex, in which he used the word "nasty" during an interview last week. He'd just learned she called him "divisive" and "misogynistic" during his 2016 presidential campaign.

Go deeper: Trump's U.K. state visit in photos

Go deeper

1 hour ago - World

Special report: Trump's U.S.-China transformation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump began his term by launching the trade war with China he had promised on the campaign trail. By mid-2020, however, Trump was no longer the public face of China policy-making as he became increasingly consumed with domestic troubles, giving his top aides carte blanche to pursue a cascade of tough-on-China policies.

Why it matters: Trump alone did not reshape the China relationship. But his trade war shattered global norms, paving the way for administration officials to pursue policies that just a few years earlier would have been unthinkable.

McConnell: Trump "provoked" Capitol mob

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Tuesday that the pro-Trump mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was "provoked by the president and other powerful people."

Why it matters: Trump was impeached by the House last week for "incitement of insurrection." McConnell has not said how he will vote in Trump's coming Senate impeachment trial, but sources told Axios' Mike Allen that the chances of him voting to convict are higher than 50%.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

GOP leaders skip Trump sendoff in favor of church with Biden

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) in July. Photo by Erin Scott-Pool/Getty Images

Congressional leaders, including House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, will skip President Trump's departure ceremony in Maryland tomorrow morning in favor of attending mass with incoming President Joe Biden ahead of his inauguration, congressional sources familiar with their plans tell Axios.

Why it matters: Their decision is a clear sign of unity before Biden takes the oath of office.