President Trump meets with industry executives on May 29. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Saturday that "the most vicious dogs, and the most ominous weapons" would have greeted protestors at the White House had they breached the area's fence on Friday night.

What's happening: Demonstrators protesting the killing of George Floyd gathered around the White House on Friday, as police cracked down on similar protests across the country.

Between the lines: A Twitter spokesperson said that Trump's tweet did not violate its rules on violence, despite the site tagging his previous threat involving shooting in response to civil unrest in Minneapolis.

  • Twitter explained the move by saying that Trump's statements are not directly encouraging others to act violently and don't reference an event that happened, and don't clearly threaten a specific person or group.
  • A specific group refers to characteristics protected by law, including race and gender.

What he's saying: "Great job last night at the White House by the U.S. @SecretService. They were not only totally professional, but very cool. I was inside, watched every move, and couldn’t have felt more safe. They let the 'protesters' scream & rant as much as they wanted, but whenever someone got too frisky or out of line, they would quickly come down on them, hard - didn’t know what hit them.

  • Trump also claimed that the protestors were "professionally organized," a theory popular amid some of the president's supporters, and took a jab at Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser for not getting local law enforcement involved.
  • "The front line was replaced with fresh agents, like magic. Big crowd, professionally organized, but nobody came close to breaching the fence. If they had they would have been greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen," Trump wrote Saturday morning.
  • "That’s when people would have been really badly hurt, at least. Many Secret Service agents just waiting for action. 'We put the young ones on the front line, sir, they love it, and good practice.' As you saw last night, they were very cool & very professional. Never let it get out of hand. Thank you!"

Go deeper: Police officer in George Floyd killing charged with third-degree murder

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Updated Sep 3, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump issues memo to cut funding from "anarchist" Democratic cities

President Trump during a speech in Wilmington, N.C., on Wednesday. Photo: Peter Zay/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

President Trump issued a memorandum on Wednesday titled "Reviewing Funding to State and Local Government Recipients That Are Permitting Anarchy, Violence, and Destruction in American Cities."

Why it matters: The review threatens to withdraw federal funding for any "anarchist jurisdiction" it finds "disempowers or defunds police departments." The memo specifically mentions the Democratic-controlled cities of Portland, Seattle, New York, and Washington, D.C.

Bill Clinton slams McConnell and Trump: "Their first value is power"

Former President Bill Clinton on Sunday called Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) vow to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg's vacant Supreme Court seat before the next presidential inauguration "superficially hypocritical."

The big picture: Clinton, who nominated Ginsburg to the court in 1993, declined to say whether he thinks Democrats should respond by adding more justices if they take back the Senate and the White House in November. Instead, he called on Republicans to "remember the example Abraham Lincoln set" by not confirming a justice in an election year.

Pelosi: Trump wants to "crush" ACA with Ginsburg replacement

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday that President Trump is rushing to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg because he "wants to crush the Affordable Care Act."

Why it matters: Pelosi wants to steer the conversation around the potential Ginsburg replacement to health care, which polls show is a top issue for voters, especially amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Trump administration has urged the courts to strike down the law, and with it, protections for millions with pre-existing conditions.