In response to a story in the New York Times claiming that members of special counsel Robert Mueller's team believe that the Mueller report is more damaging that Attorney General Bill Barr has indicated, President Trump lashed out on Twitter and called the Times a "Fake News paper" with no "legitimate sources."

"The New York Times had no legitimate sources, which would be totally illegal, concerning the Mueller Report. In fact, they probably had no sources at all! They are a Fake News paper who have already been forced to apologize for their incorrect and very bad reporting on me!"

The big picture: The Times story, which has been corroborated by the Washington Post and NBC News, reports that Mueller investigators have expressed frustration to associates about Barr's summary of his "principal conclusions" of the special counsel's findings. One source told the Washington Post: "It was much more acute than Barr suggested." The Justice Department released a statement on Thursday clarifying that Barr's letter was not intended to be a summary of the full Mueller report.

The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

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The cliffhanger could be ... Georgia

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992, but Georgia's changing demographics may prove pivotal this year — not only to Trump v. Biden, but also to whether Democrats take control of the Senate.

Why it matters: If the fate of the Senate did hinge on Georgia, it might be January before we know the outcome. Meanwhile, voters' understanding of this power in the final days of the election could juice turnout enough to impact presidential results.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
5 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes. A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.