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Protestors at the Capitol steps on Jan. 6. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A leader of the far-right "Oath Keepers" militia who breached the Capitol on Jan. 6 "indicated that she was awaiting direction from President Trump" as Biden's inauguration approached, federal prosecutors said in a court filing on Thursday.

Why it matters: Multiple defendants have told media outlets and law enforcement that they attended Trump's Jan. 6 rally at the president's request. But the assertion made Thursday, which was first reported by CNN, is the most direct link yet that prosecutors have drawn between Trump's rhetoric and the breach at the Capitol.

Prosecutors say the defendant Jessica Watkins' concerns about taking action without Trump's support are evident in a Nov. 9 text: “I am concerned this is an elaborate trap. Unless the POTUS himself activates us, it’s not legit. The POTUS has the right to activate units too. If Trump asks me to come, I will. Otherwise, I can’t trust it.”

  • "Watkins had perceived her desired signal by the end of December," prosecutors wrote in the memorandum seeking to keep Watkins detained pending a trial.

State of play: Watkins has been indicted on charges including conspiracy, with the Justice Department alleging that she and others made plans and coordinated ahead of the attack.

  • The DOJ said in the Thursday filing that she recruited and trained people to be in "fighting shape" for the presidential inauguration.

The big picture: Some rioters have said they breached the Capitol at Trump's urging or that they were welcomed into the building at the "invitation" of the president.

  • The lawyer of another person who has been charged told USA Today their client traveled to D.C. from Pennsylvania with about 50 other conservatives "with no intention of rioting or storming the Capitol," but that this allegedly changed after he heard speeches from the former president, Rudy Giuliani, and others.
  • In a video showing 13 minutes of the chaos and violence that unfolded on Jan. 6 used by House impeachment managers on Tuesday, the mob was seen chanting “fight for Trump,” “traitor Pence,” and vowing that they would “take the Capitol” and “stop the steal.”

What they're saying: “There is nothing they showed today that in any way tied this to Donald Trump,” attorney David Schoen argued on “Hannity” Tuesday evening, in reference to the opening presentation by impeachment managers.

Go deeper: Impeachment managers show graphic video of Capitol riot violence at start of trial

Go deeper

Impeachment trial recap, day 2: House managers air unseen riot footage

Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Trump on January 6. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

House impeachment managers began presenting their prosecution of former President Trump on Wednesday, laying out their evidence — including previously unseen Capitol security footage from the Jan. 6 insurrection — before a divided Senate.

The big picture: One by one, managers detailed how Trump laid the groundwork for his supporters to believe "the big lie" — that the election would be stolen — for months leading up to the attack. Rep. Joe Neguse (D-Colo.) called Trump's false claims "the drumbeat being used to inspire, instigate, and ignite them," stressing that the incitement didn't just begin with the president's speech on Jan. 6.

Updated Feb 12, 2021 - Politics & Policy

The daily highlights from Trump's 2nd Senate impeachment trial

Trucks with LED screens displaying anti-Trump messages in front of the Capitol. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

President Trump was acquitted by the Senate on Feb. 13 in his second impeachment trial, in which he was faced a single charge from the House of Representatives for inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

The big picture: At five days, it was the fastest impeachment trial of a U.S. president and ended with the most bipartisan conviction vote in history. Still, the seven Republicans who joined all Democrats were not enough to reach the two-thirds majority necessary for conviction.

Impeachment trial recap, day 1: Senate votes trial is constitutional

The impeachment trial for former President Trump kicked off in the Senate on Tuesday, beginning with debate over the constitutionality of the House prosecuting a president who has already left office.

The bottom line: After four hours of arguments by each side, the Senate affirmed by a vote of 56-44 that it is constitutional to try a former president.