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Trump tweeted this picture of him golfing yesterday with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods in Jupiter, Florida.

In early 2016, with Donald Trump lending tens of millions of dollars to his presidential campaign, he sought a loan from Deutsche Bank, one of the few banks still willing to lend him money — and got turned down, the NY Times' David Enrich, Jesse Drucker and Ben Protess scoop.

Be smart: We're going to start to see more and more leaks — especially of the follow-the-money sort — from the 17 known investigations of Trump and Russia. Investigators and prosecutors will be sharing material that they may not be able to use in their cases, but that could be very useful to Democrats for congressional probes and even impeachment efforts.

  • "The failed loan request ... shows that he was actively engaged in running his business in the midst of the presidential campaign, and it is likely to attract scrutiny from Democrats on two House committees that are investigating his two-decade relationship with Deutsche Bank."
  • Among the concerns of senior officials at the bank "was that if Mr. Trump won the election and then defaulted, Deutsche Bank would have to choose between not collecting on the debt or seizing the assets of the president of the United States."

Go deeper: Coming soon: Democrats vs. Deutsche Bank

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
43 mins ago - Economy & Business

Biden's inflation danger

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President-elect Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus proposal has economists and bullish market analysts revising their U.S. growth expectations higher, predicting a reflation of the economy in 2021 and possibly more booming returns for risk assets.

Yes, but: Others are warning that what's expected to be reflation could actually show up as inflation, a much less welcome phenomenon.

Ina Fried, author of Login
3 hours ago - Technology

CES was largely irrelevant this year

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Forced online by the pandemic and overshadowed by the attack on the Capitol, the 2021 edition of CES was mostly an afterthought as media's attention focused elsewhere.

Why it matters: The consumer electronics trade show is the cornerstone event for the Consumer Technology Association and Las Vegas has been the traditional early-January gathering place for the tech industry.

The FBI is tracing a digital trail to Capitol rioters

Illustration: Sarah Grillo

Capitol rioters, eager to share proof of their efforts with other extremists online, have so far left a digital footprint of at least 140,000 images that is making it easier for federal law enforcement officials to capture and arrest them.

The big picture: Law enforcement's use of digital tracing isn't new, and has long been at the center of fierce battles over privacy and civil liberties. The Capitol siege is opening a fresh front in that debate.