Donald Trump in the Oval Office. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In his first national address from the Oval Office on Tuesday night, President Trump cast the state of unauthorized immigration along the southern border with Mexico as "a crisis of the heart and a crisis of the soul," but did not declare a national emergency, as he suggested he might last week.

The big picture: Trump's demand for $5.7 billion in funding for his border wall has resulted in a nearly three-week shutdown, currently the second longest in history. There has been a surge of asylum claims and families crossing the southern border this past year, but it is no worse than other increases in recent years, according to data from U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Flashback: Trump told Democratic leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi before the shutdown began that he was "proud to shut down the government." He has since shifted blame to the Democrats.

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Updated 8 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 19,909,062 — Total deaths: 732,128 — Total recoveries — 12,138,271Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 5,053,123 — Total deaths: 163,047 — Total recoveries: 1,656,864 — Total tests: 61,792,571Map.
  3. Business: Richer Americans are more comfortable eating out.
  4. Public health: How America can do smarter testing.
  5. Sports: The cost of kids losing gym class — College football is on the brink.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Indoor air is the next hotspot.

Twitter jumps into the fray for TikTok

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Twitter is the latest to join the cast of the ongoing spectacle that is TikTok’s battle to stay open for business in the U.S., per a new report from the Wall Street Journal.

Why it matters: The saga to keep TikTok available to U.S. users is getting more complicated, with the company already in a President Trump-imposed time crunch and juggling a number of options.

Downtown Chicago hit by widespread looting

Police officers inspect a damaged Best Buy in Chicago that was looted and vandalized. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chicago police responded to hundreds of people looting stores and causing widespread property damage in the city's downtown overnight, resulting in at least one exchange of gunfire, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The state of play: Police superintendent David Brown said the event was a coordinated response after an officer shot a suspect on Sunday evening, per CBS Chicago.