Evan Vucci / AP

President Trump delivered unscheduled remarks at the White House Monday, where he condemned individuals who committed acts of violence on Saturday in Charlottesville, Virginia. He specifically singled out acts of racism as "evil." The statement comes after Trump's meeting with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and FBI Director Chris Wray.

  • Key quote: "Racism is evil, and those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans."
  • "The Department of Justice has opened a civil rights investigation into the deadly car attack that killed one innocent person and injured 20 others... To anyone who acted criminally in this weekend's racist violence, you will be held accountable."
  • "No matter the color of our skin, we all live under the same laws. We all salute the same great flag. We are all made by the same almighty God."

Trump's language today went one step further than his initial remarks at his golf club in New Jersey Saturday: "[W]e're closely following the terrible events unfolding in Charlottesville, Virginia. We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides. On many sides."

Go deeper: Axios' Mike Allen and Alexi McCammond break down the Charlottesville chaos and explain how Trump is on the defensive after his oddly measured response.

Watch Trump's statement:

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