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President Trump accused "Fox News Sunday" host Chris Wallace of misrepresenting the difficulty of a cognitive test that he recently took, claiming: "The first two questions are easy, but I bet you couldn't even answer the last five questions. They get very hard."

Why it matters: Trump has accused his opponent Joe Biden of being mentally incompetent and unable to serve as president because of his alleged cognitive decline. As Wallace pointed out, a Fox News poll found 47% of respondents believe Biden has the mental soundness to serve effectively, compared to 43% who believe the same of Trump.

The exchange:

TRUMP: "Let's take a test right now. Let's go down. Joe and I will take a test. Let him take the same test that I took."
WALLACE: "Incidentally, I took the test too when I heard that you passed it. It's not – well it's not the hardest test. They have a picture and it says “what’s that” and it’s an elephant."
TRUMP: "No, no, no. ... You see, that's all misrepresentation."
WALLACE: "Well, that's what it was on the web."
TRUMP: "It's all misrepresentation. Because, yes, the first few questions are easy, but I'll bet you couldn't even answer the last five questions. I'll bet you couldn't, they get very hard, the last five questions."
WALLACE: "Well, one of them was count back from 100 by seven."
TRUMP: "Let me tell you ... you couldn't answer -- you couldn't answer many of the questions."
WALLACE: "Ok, what's the question?"
TRUMP: "I'll get you the test, I'd like to give it. But I guarantee you that Joe Biden could not answer those questions."

How it works: The Montreal Cognitive Assessment, or MoCA, screens for mild cognitive dysfunction. It measures areas such as attention and concentration, executive functions, memory, language among others. A score of 26 out of 30 is considered normal.

Editor's note: Updates with details on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.

Go deeper

Trump says he doesn't remember being tested for COVID-19 before first debate

President Trump and Joe Biden at the first presidential debate on Sept. 29.

President Trump said during a town hall event aired on NBC News Thursday that he does not recall being tested for the coronavirus before the first presidential debate on Sept. 29.

Why it matters: The president tested positive for the virus on Oct. 2, just three days after standing onstage with former Vice President Joe Biden. The Commission on Presidential Debates requires that candidates test before the event.

Ina Fried, author of Login
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Epic's long game against Apple

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Epic's Apple lawsuit is costing the company dearly, but the game developer has its eye on a valuable long-term goal: prying tomorrow's virtual worlds loose from the grip of app store proprietors like Apple.

Between the lines: Epic isn't spending a fortune in legal fees and foregoing a ton of revenue just to shave some costs off in-app purchases on today's phones. Rather, it's planning for a future of creating virtual universes via augmented and virtual reality — without having to send a big chunk of their economies to Apple or Google.

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Why it matters: The U.S. aims to at least partially vaccinate 70% of adults by July 4, a move expected to accelerate the current drop of new infections here. But variants are the wild card, and in a global pandemic where only about 8% of all people have received one dose, the virus will continue mutating unabated.