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Lead story of today's New York Times

In a deeply reported article on "How Trump's Billion-Dollar Campaign Lost Its Cash Advantage," the N.Y. Times' Shane Goldmacher and Maggie Haberman found some unusual spending by the Trump campaign.

Why it matters: Money concerns are very real for President Trump's campaign — an unusual predicament for a sitting president, and one that worries veteran Republican operatives.

Details:

  • "Super Bowl ads that cost $11 million."
  • "$156,000 for planes to pull aerial banners in recent months."
  • "Nearly $110,000 to Yondr, a company that makes magnetic pouches used to store cellphones during fundraisers so that donors could not secretly record Trump and leak his remarks."
  • "[M]ore than $1 million in ads aired in the Washington, D.C., media market," which the Times characterizes as a "Trump-pleasing expense."
  • "[A]bout $4 million into the Trump family businesses since 2019."
  • "Hershey Company, the chocolate-maker ($337,000), which cover costs for items such as the White House-branded M&Ms given away by administrations of both parties."
  • Former campaign manager Brad Parscale "had a car and driver, an unusual expense for a campaign manager."

Keep reading (subscription).

Go deeper

Nov 2, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Biden campaign: "Under no scenario" will Trump be declared winner on election night

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Biden campaign is preparing for a long election night and is warning the country — and the media — to ignore any victory declaration from President Trump before all the ballots are counted.

Why it matters: Trump has told confidants that he will prematurely declare victory on election night if he looks like he’s "ahead," even if crucial states haven't finished counting. “Under no scenario will Donald Trump be declared a victor on election night,” Biden campaign manager Jen O’Malley Dillon said in a briefing Monday.

2 hours ago - World

Map: A look at world population density in 3D

This fascinating map is made by Alasdair Rae of Sheffield, England, a former professor of urban studies who is the founder of Automatic Knowledge. It shows world population density in 3D.

Details: "No land is shown on the map, only the locations where people actually live. ... The higher the spike, the more people live in an area. Where there are no spikes, there are no people (e.g. you can clearly identify ... the Sahara Desert)."

Biden's Day 1 challenges: The immigration reset

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President-elect Biden has an aggressive Day 1 immigration agenda that relies heavily on executive actions to undo President Trump's crackdown.

Why it matters: It's not that easy. Trump issued more than 400 executive actions on immigration. Advocates are fired up. The Supreme Court could threaten the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and experts warn there could be another surge at the border.