Members of the Nevada National Guard put down social distancing decals at a new coronavirus testing site in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Monday. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

President Trump issued a memo Monday announcing he's reauthorized funding for the National Guard to assist states with their response to the coronavirus pandemic until the end of 2020.

The big picture: Trump's memo to the secretaries of Homeland Security and Defense outlines that the federal government won't fully cover states for National Guard use when the current authorization expires on Aug. 21.

  • Instead, the Federal Emergency Management Agency will fund 75% of National Guard activities "associated with preventing, mitigating, and responding to the threat to public health and safety posed by the virus," per the memo.

Of note: The National Governors Association (NGA) called on Trump earlier Monday to extend the use of National Guard operations in response to and recovery from COVID-19, covered by Title 32.

  • "Over the weekend, states and territories were already forced to start the transition process for guard members to ensure compliance with required quarantine policy. Likewise, states and territories will begin the paperwork and training of new guard members in state active duty starting today," the NGA said in a statement.

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