Apple CEO Tim Cook and President Trump at the White House in March. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump said Sunday Apple CEO Tim Cook made a "very compelling argument" during a meeting with him on how paying tariffs would make it difficult for the tech giant to compete with the likes of Samsung.

The big picture: Trump announced last week he would delay for 3 months tariffs on some Chinese imports, including certain tech goods, footwear and clothing. The 10% tariffs that were due to go into effect Sept. 1 would have affected iPhones and iPads.

Between the lines: The threat of a crashing stock market and higher Christmas shopping prices seemed to spook the Trump administration, despite the president's false insistence that China pays the cost of tariffs directly into the U.S. Treasury.

Go deeper: The forever trade war

Go deeper

The TikTok deal's for-show provisions and flimsy foundations

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The new deal to rescue TikTok from a threatened U.S. ban — full of provisions aimed at creating the temporary appearance of a presidential win — looks like a sort of Potemkin village agreement.

How it works: Potemkin villages were fake-storefront towns stood up to impress a visiting czar and dignitaries. When the visitors left, the stage set got struck.

  • Similarly, many elements of this plan look hastily erected and easily abandoned once the spotlight moves on.
35 mins ago - Technology

Over 3 million U.S. voters have already registered on social media

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

An estimated 2.5 million+ Americans have registered to vote on Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger, Facebook announced Monday. More than 733,000 Americans have registered to vote so far via Snapchat.

Why it matters: The broad reach of social media platforms makes them uniquely effective at engaging voters — especially younger voters who may not know how to register to vote or be civically engaged.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
54 mins ago - Economy & Business

Wall Street: Recession is over

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

U.S. economic activity fell more sharply in the second quarter of this year than during any other quarter in history. It's also going to grow more sharply in the third quarter of this year than during any other quarter in history.

  • The recession is over, according to Wall Street, with current forecasts showing sustained economic growth through 2021 and beyond.