Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Today is the beginning of the second Affordable Care Act enrollment season under President Trump. And things are … surprisingly normal.

The big picture: The ACA has been in a state of upheaval since Trump’s inauguration. Some of the changes Republicans made during that upheaval will likely weaken the law. At this moment, though, the watchword for insurers is stability. Things may not be ideal, but at least they’re largely settled.

What they’re saying: “From a consumer perspective, the experience should be pretty good,” said Kelley Turek, a policy specialist at America’s Health Insurance Plans, the industry’s leading trade organization.

  • Technical testing with HealthCare.gov has gone well, Turek said, and back-end systems that coordinate between enrollees and insurers seem to be in good shape.

This will be the first enrollment period in which Trump’s ACA agenda is fully in place.

  • People will be able to buy skimpy, inexpensive “short-term” plans as an alternative to comprehensive, potentially subsidized ACA coverage. They won't be sold through the ACA's exchanges, but will compete through brokers and other websites.
  • The individual mandate won’t be in effect.
  • Federal outreach funding, and grants to “navigators” who helped people compare their options, have been slashed.

What we’re watching: Insurers generally feel that they’ve already calibrated for those policy changes, mainly through sky-high premium increases a year ago. This upcoming enrollment period will determine whether they got that balance right.

  • Before the ACA’s exchanges had opened, losing the individual mandate seemed like a disaster. Its actual disappearance was greeted more with a shrug. Real-world experience raised questions about whether it had enough “teeth,” Turek said.
  • Short-term plans could siphon healthy consumers away from ACA coverage, making it more expensive for those who remain. But they could also be a reasonable option for people who can’t afford ACA coverage, Turek said, as long as they know what they’re buying.

The bottom line: The ACA may not be working as Democrats had initially hoped, but it’s not dead, and for now it seems to have settled into a scaled-back status quo that’s sustainable.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 10 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Tim Scott says Trump "misspoke" when he told Proud Boys to "stand by"

Photo: Bonnie Cash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told reporters on Wednesday that he believes President Trump "misspoke" when he told the far-right "Proud Boys" group to "stand back and stand by" in response to a question about condemning white supremacy at the first presidential debate.

Catch up quick: Moderator Chris Wallace asked Trump on Tuesday, "Are you willing, tonight, to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and to say that they need to stand down?" Trump asked who specifically he should condemn, and then responded, "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by. But I'll tell you what, somebody's got to do something about antifa and the left."

53 mins ago - Podcasts

Palantir co-founder on its mission and controversies

Palantir Technologies today went public at an initial valuation of more than $21 billion, giving investors a chance to buy into one of Silicon Valley's most talked-about tech companies.

Axios Re:Cap dives into Palantir's mission and controversies with company co-founder Joe Lonsdale.

Commission on Presidential Debates wants "additional structure" for remaining debates

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images.

The Commission on Presidential Debates announced Wednesday that it plans to implement changes to rules for the remaining debates, after Tuesday night's head-to-head between Joe Biden and Donald Trump was practically incoherent for most of the night.

What they are saying: "Last night's debate made clear that additional structure should be added to the format of the remaining debates to ensure a more orderly discussion of the issues," the CPD said in a statement.