President Trump told reporters on Monday that his executive order to support insurers covering pre-existing conditions would be a "signal" to show Americans where Republicans stand on the issue.

Why it matters: The Trump administration is currently arguing before the Supreme Court that the Affordable Care Act — which enforces the policy that Trump is referencing — should be struck down.

What he's saying: When asked why he needed to issue a statement on pre-existing conditions via executive order, Trump said it is "just a double safety net, just to let people know that the Republicans are totally and strongly in favor of pre-existing condition, taking care of people with pre-existing conditions."

  • "It's a signal to people, it's a second platform. We have pre-existing conditions will be taken care of 100% by Republicans and the Republican Party," Trump added.
  • "And I'll be issuing at some point in the not-too-distant future a very strong statement on that, probably in the form of an executive order."

The bottom line: People with pre-existing conditions are at a higher risk of being seriously ill from the novel coronavirus, according to the CDC.

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Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Oct 15, 2020 - Health

Outpatient visits bounce back

Reproduced from The Commonwealth Fund; Chart: Axios Visuals

Outpatient visits have returned to their pre-pandemic levels after declining by nearly 60%, according to a new analysis by the Commonwealth Fund.

Why it matters: The massive drop-off in people seeking medical care was bad both for providers and for patients, many of whom delayed care for conditions that may have worsened.

California to independently review FDA-approved coronavirus vaccines

California Gov. Gavin Newsom. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California will "independently review" all coronavirus vaccines approved by the Food and Drug Administration before allowing their distribution, Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) announced at a news conference Monday.

Why it matters: The move that comes days after NAID director Anthony Fauci said he had "strong confidence" in FDA-approved vaccines could cast further public doubt that the federal government could release a vaccine based on political motives, rather than safety and efficacy.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Trump calls Fauci a "disaster" on campaign call.
  2. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — 8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  3. States: Wisconsin judge reimposes capacity limit on indoor venues.
  4. Media: Trump attacks CNN as "dumb b*stards" for continuing to cover pandemic.
  5. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  6. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
  7. Education: Why education technology can’t save remote learning.