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Security forces patrol the US-Mexico border on September 18, 2019. Photo: Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration on Friday issued a proclamation requiring immigrant-visa applicants to prove they can obtain health insurance within 30 days of entering the U.S. or cover their own health care expenses.

The big picture: A recent increase in the number of people without health insurance has coincided with the Trump administration discouraging immigrants from applying for and using government health care programs, like Medicaid.

Details: The plan, scheduled to go into effect on Nov. 3, stipulates that if migrants "possess the financial resources to pay for reasonably foreseeable medical costs," they would be exempt from needing documented health insurance.

The impact: The proclamation is a "classic catch-22" for low-income immigrants, Larry Levitt of the Kaiser Family Foundation told Politico.

  • "They will need health insurance to be in the country legally [and] the only way they may be able to afford coverage is with ACA subsidies," Levitt said. "But, if they buy insurance with ACA subsidies, it won't count as insurance under the proclamation."

Background: In August, the Department of Homeland Security published a rule to penalize immigrants who use or are likely to use public benefit programs such as food stamps, housing assistance or Medicaid.

  • Top 2020 Democrats like Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Kamala Harris and Pete Buttigieg support providing health care for undocumented immigrants in the U.S.

Go deeper: Fear over Trump's immigration crackdown may be linked to rise in uninsured

Editor's note: This story's headline has been updated to clarify the Trump administration will require immigrants to get health insurance.

Go deeper

Cold December as safety nets expire

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Safety nets are likely to be yanked from underneath millions of vulnerable Americans in December, as the coronavirus surges.

Why it matters: Those most at risk are depending on one or more relief programs that are set to expire, right as the economic recovery becomes more fragile than it's been in months.

15 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

17 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.

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