Oct 5, 2019

Trump admin wants to require immigrants to get health insurance

Security forces patrol the US-Mexico border on September 18, 2019. Photo: Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration on Friday issued a proclamation requiring immigrant-visa applicants to prove they can obtain health insurance within 30 days of entering the U.S. or cover their own health care expenses.

The big picture: A recent increase in the number of people without health insurance has coincided with the Trump administration discouraging immigrants from applying for and using government health care programs, like Medicaid.

Details: The plan, scheduled to go into effect on Nov. 3, stipulates that if migrants "possess the financial resources to pay for reasonably foreseeable medical costs," they would be exempt from needing documented health insurance.

The impact: The proclamation is a "classic catch-22" for low-income immigrants, Larry Levitt of the Kaiser Family Foundation told Politico.

  • "They will need health insurance to be in the country legally [and] the only way they may be able to afford coverage is with ACA subsidies," Levitt said. "But, if they buy insurance with ACA subsidies, it won't count as insurance under the proclamation."

Background: In August, the Department of Homeland Security published a rule to penalize immigrants who use or are likely to use public benefit programs such as food stamps, housing assistance or Medicaid.

  • Top 2020 Democrats like Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Kamala Harris and Pete Buttigieg support providing health care for undocumented immigrants in the U.S.

Go deeper: Fear over Trump's immigration crackdown may be linked to rise in uninsured

Editor's note: This story's headline has been updated to clarify the Trump administration will require immigrants to get health insurance.

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Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

5 hours ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.

New York Times says Tom Cotton op-ed did not meet standards

Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

A New York Times spokesperson said in a statement Thursday that the paper will be changing its editorial board processes after a Wednesday op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), which called for President Trump to "send in the troops" in order to quell violent protests, failed to meet its standards.

Why it matters: The shift comes after Times employees began a coordinated movement on social media on Wednesday and Thursday that argued that publishing the op-ed put black staff in danger. Cotton wrote that Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act in order to deploy the U.S. military against rioters that have overwhelmed police forces in cities across the country.