Axios Oct 9
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Trump administration axing Obama-era clean power rule

Photo: Dake Kang / AP

EPA Administrator Pruitt said Monday morning that the Trump administration will withdraw from the Obama-era clean power plan, per the Associated Press.

We all know this is coming, but this will serve as the official starting gun for what is bound to be a protracted regulatory, political, and legal fight.

A preview of what to expect starting on Tuesday, from Axios' Generate newsletter:

  • EPA will issue a proposed rule repealing the rule outright.
  • Then the agency will take a separate action at another time (specifics to be determined) asking for public comment about what kind of rule (if any) to issue cutting carbon emissions.
  • Why that matters: That pre-regulatory step will prolong any action toward a carbon rule by several months if not a year or more.

Go deeper: Look at Politico's copy of the draft rule and some coverage of the anticipated repeal: Politico, Bloomberg and Washington Post.

Mike Allen 4 hours ago
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A White House olive branch: no plan to fire Mueller

Photo: Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

After a weekend at war with the Mueller investigation, the White House is extending an olive branch. Ty Cobb, the White House lawyer handling the probe, plans to issue this statement:

“In response to media speculation and related questions being posed to the Administration, the White House yet again confirms that the President is not considering or discussing the firing of the Special Counsel, Robert Mueller.”

Why it matters: The White House strategy had been to cooperate with Mueller. So this is an effort to turn down the temperature after a weekend of increasingly personal provocations aimed at the special counsel.

Jonathan Swan 6 hours ago
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Trump's trade plan that would blow up the WTO

President Trump announces tariffs on steel and aluminum earlier this month, flanked by Steven Mnuchin, Wilbur Ross, Robert Lighthizer, and Peter Navarro. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

For months, President Donald Trump has been badgering his economic advisors to give him broad, unilateral authority to raise tariffs — a move that would all but break the World Trade Organization.

His favorite word: “reciprocal.” He’s always complaining to staff about the fact that the U.S. has much lower tariffs on some foreign goods than other countries have on the same American-made goods. The key example is cars: The European Union has a 10 percent tariff on all cars, including those manufactured in America, and China hits all foreign-made cars with 25 percent tariffs. But the U.S. only charges 2.5 percent for foreign cars we import.